Dentistry Magazine - 2018 Text Version | 1

Skyward - Taking dental education to the next level

Spring/Summer 2018 The Magazine Of Texas A&M College of Dentistry

Editor Carolyn Cox
Contributors LaDawn Brock, Deborah Clark, Jenny Fuentes, Melissa Ogden, Linda Piper,
Erica Shaffer, Brigitte Sims, Art Upton
Designer Jan Pults
Photographer Steven Crow, Media Resources
Executive Director, Advancement, Communications & Alumni Relations Susan Mitchell Jackson

Texas A&M Dentistry magazine is published by the Office of Advancement, Communications & Alumni Relations;Texas A&M College of Dentistry; 3302 Gaston Avenue; Dallas,Texas 75246; 214.828.8214.

This issue was printed July 2018. Production of the magazine is supported by a grant to the college from the Baylor Oral Health Foundation. Financial support to defray printing and mailing expenses is provided by the Alumni Association. The College of Dentistry serves people of all ages regardless of socioeconomic level, race, color, sex, religion, disability, national origin or sexual orientation.

Pain, Interrupted

Chronic pain in the head, neck and jaw has the power to halt life in its tracks. Just how do you stop the cycle of this invisible problem? Three patients share their stories and how Texas A&M College of Dentistry’s Clinical Center for Facial Pain and Sleep Medicine helped them live again.

Departments Features

If You Build It


A framework for progress is climbing skyward a block from Texas A&M College of Dentistry, evolving steadily into the college's new Clinic and Education Building. The facility is designed to elevate patient care with the latest technology, revamped curriculum and a group practice educational model.

Find Our News On The Web: https://dentistryinsider.tamhsc.edu

Share Your Thoughts

The magazine welcomes your feedback and suggestions. Send comments to ccox@tamhsc.edu, phone 214.828.8218, or mail to Carolyn Cox, Editor;Texas A&M College of Dentistry; Office of Advancement, Communications & Alumni Relations; 3302 Gaston Ave.; Dallas,Texas 75246.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 2

Editors Corner

The oldest living alumni of Texas A&M College of Dentistry experienced their youth through the Great Depression, World War II, handwritten letters via postal mail, the advent of commercial air travel and Technicolor movies. Our youngest graduates grew up in the shadow of global terrorism, the Great Recession, the mobile phone and the explosion of the internet and social media.

This insight is not random at all; over the past few months I’ve had engaging visits with several longtime alumni from the classes of 1947 and 1951. What a collection of stories they have to share! I’ve also chatted about life and dentistry with current students, who have no shortage of wit and wisdom to pass along.

It’s enlightening to gather perspectives from dental professionals at all points of the career spectrum. Getting to purvey interesting stories about unique people in this magazine and our news website, Dentistry Insider, is something I will always enjoy.

Our newest alumni know a different world in the profession than alumni who graduated decades ago. Alongside educational debt, which has reached astronomical levels, technological advances continue to transform patient care in this era of dental implants and CAD/CAM technology; amazing considering even air-operated high-speed drills weren't widely used until the 1960s.

Yet success and happiness depend on the people who occupy any age, not just their environments, and even individuals within the same generation have contrasting experiences. Perhaps we are more alike than we might think?

Check out our new series, “The way I see it,” at dentistryinsider.tamhsc.edu for a glimpse of life by alumni of all ages. And please share your own perspective; contact me at ccox@tamhsc.edu or 214.828.8214. There’s inspiration waiting to be discovered.

Carolyn Cox, Editor

From The Memory Vault


Dr. J.A.”Bob” Dewberry ’47 practiced in Dallas for more than 50 years, one of the early endodontists “plowing new ground as we went along.” He shares a few memories here and on page 32, asserting, “I still love my profession and my old school despite its change of name.”

“The year was 1950, and I had been practicing several months with my mentor, Dr. Seth Lee Barron, faculty member in endodontics at the dental school. He and Dr. Bernhard Gottlieb and Dr. Hobson Crook from Dallas had written a small book, Gottlieb and Barron were well known to the tiny national endodontic community, and Crook was a popular endodontist in the Medical Arts Building. Though the ‘Endodontia,’ together. Both book failed to catch on, I had a front-row seat to this project, immersed in the lore of Viennese dentistry of the period.

Frankly, I was shocked at the state of therapeutics in endodontics in the early 1950s. It was rife with procedures having very little rationale to treatment. Among these was ‘ionization,’ a lengthy and frightening process. A further ‘mandate’ was that of transferring swabs of the root canal to petri dishes until ‘there was no growth’; presuming sterility. No thought was given to anaerobic bacteria, which perished when exposed to air.

At one point Dr. Barron suggested we double our fee for root canals on single-rooted teeth from $5 to $10. I felt we could not possibly expect patients to pay such a high fee simply to keep a tooth with a cheaper alternative of extraction. He was wiser, and we did double our fees.

Regardless, we always lost some one-third of receivables, as patients would ask to be billed and then never respond. Today’s demand of payment at the time of service would have been unacceptable.

None of us had much business sense. Once I took a course on dental business practices. The most I got from this was, ‘Never give away your time and expertise.’ As I did lots of diagnostics and would frequently say there was ‘no fee,’ the instructor said, ‘Simply bow politely and say, ‘$2 please.’”

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 3

Message From The Dean

Dr. Lawrence E. Wolinsky

There’s nothing like the lasting bonds formed over shared experiences. As dean, I observe from a bird's-eye view the significance of the connections made during dental and dental hygiene school. I witness the anxiousness of our students as they begin their journey, and I hear the wonderful tales of years gone by from our alumni celebrating 50- or 60-year anniversaries.

As I anticipate the future our new clinical building brings, I am experiencing a bit of nostalgia as I think about all that has been accomplished in our current facility since I arrived. A successful reaccreditation in 2011 and folks hard at work preparing for another site visit later this year, seven class years of students to complete their education and graduate, multiple National Institutes of Health grants boosting our college’s research stature, and tens of thousands of patients served.

Of course, this building’s walls have housed many milestones over the past 68 years: the birth of the Caruth School of Dental Hygiene in 1955, the establishment of graduate programs in every dental specialty, and the opening of Texas’ first Dental Simulation Laboratory for preclinical students in August 2002, to name a few.

Day in and day out at this corner of Gaston and Hall, thousands of students have acquired the knowledge and skills for pursuing careers in the dental profession. One simple fact underlies every accomplishment: The tireless dedication of our faculty and staff make every part of the college’s mission possible.

There's no denying my enthusiasm about the future that awaits our students and patients in the new Clinic and Education Building. Its light-filled, modern spaces will provide the ability to enhance our educational and patient care activities through innovations in curriculum and physical facilities. The square footage freed up in our current building will enable expansion of our research enterprise; an exciting complement to the tremendous achievements of our research faculty.

It's an exciting time in the life of our college, and it’s great to witness the teamwork of our family of students, faculty, staff and alumni. Our people make all the difference at Texas A&M College of Dentistry.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 4

Culture Fest Serves Up Food And Celebration

Inspiration For Culture Fest started in, of all places, the Sim Lab. Fasiha Jafri, then a second-year dental student, couldn’t help but hear a conversation just over her shoulder.

“I overheard a couple of our classmates speaking in Farsi. Soon after, another conversation in Spanish overlapped the first, and I marveled at how lucky we were to be able to attend the No. 1 most diverse school in the entire nation,” says Jafri.

“When we started counting how many languages were spoken in our class alone, we ran out of breath.There were too many to count, and this set the foundation to get everyone involved to contribute what they believed their culture to be in the form of clothes, food, items and more,” says Jafri. “Culture Fest is not about spreading cultural awareness; it’s about celebrating every culture!”

Although Muslim Student Dental Association members coordinated the April 25 event, students from multiple organizations volunteered to host booths – complete with posters, regional attire and, of course, food.What resulted was a sixth floor lobby packed with students, faculty and staff sharing traditions, music and local fare for their entire lunch hour.

“There was such a warm, loving, festive feeling in the room,” says Susan Jackson, executive director of advancement, communications and alumni relations. “It was one of the best events I’ve ever attended at the college. I felt so proud of our school and the diversity of our students.”

From ladoo, a Pakistani sweet, and Canadian maple syrup to spiced jicama at the Mexico display, there was no shortage of flavors, conversation or the opportunity to learn from one another.

Plans already are in the works for next year, and with it, ideas for dance demonstrations and even more involvement throughout the college.

“We have high hopes that Culture Fest 2018 will set a precedent for coming years and become a time-honored tradition,” says Jafri.

A round the world in an hour: Student volunteer s shared the sights, sounds and flavors of more than 20 cultures.

Close Encounters Of The Dental Kind

Classy move: The class gift tradition continues as 2018 dental graduates generously gave checks to the college’s Alumni Association and Social Services Dental Care Fund and tokens of appreciation to staff members.

Nearly a dozen faculty, staff, administrators and students performed as “Mickey & the Molars” for a November concert benefiting Dallas’ Baxter-Crowley Agape Clinic, where dental students and attending faculty cover 6,000 patient visits annually.

Seize the ZZZZs, mothers- to-be: Snoring can be unhealthy for a pregnant woman and her developing child. A study at the college is enrolling pregnant women to determine if an oral appliance can improve sleep quality and airway function during pregnancy. Research Scholars Day, now 45 years running, is a spring semester tradition.

Faculty and staff can soak up dental and graduate student presentations and a sixth floor lobby brimming with dental and dental hygiene student research posters.

Students took a “paws” from final exams in May for a dental school visit by Heart of Texas Therapy Dogs. A little stress relief from Harper, Aggie, Cooper, Shrek and Rocky, and then it was time to hit the books again.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 5

The Gift Of A Smile

On The Home Stretch to her high school graduation, Hannah McCain dreamed of one thing to make this exciting time even more special: a new smile for her prom and graduation photos.

That didn’t seem likely for the 17-yearold, who was born with a rare form of dwarfism associated with small tooth roots, loose teeth and a weak jawbone, among many other medical issues.

Eating was a painful experience. Hannah was dropping weight, something her small frame couldn’t afford, says her mom, Sheryl Martin. It was only a matter of time before she lost all of her teeth.

Then two Texas A&M College of Dentistry faculty members stepped in to help. Hannah’s family dentist knew she needed specialized care and contacted Dr. Amirali Zandinejad, associate professor and director of the advanced education in general dentistry residency program at the College of Dentistry. Zandinejad had treated patients similar to Hannah, but her case was complicated because she lacked the bone to support implants.

Zandinejad consulted with Dr. Likith Reddy, clinical professor and director of residency training in oral and maxillofacial surgery, and the two felt they could help. Several times each month Hannah and her mother made the trek from Aubrey, Texas, to the college for appointments to gather clinical data and plan treatment.

Upon learning the cost of the treatment plan and that insurance would not cover it, Hannah took action, creating a GoFundMe page to help her family with the expenses. “A dental company reached out to us after hearing Hannah’s story in the news and offered to do the full procedure for free, saying Hannah could take the money she raised and use it for college,” Martin says. “But we decided to stick with the doctors at the dental school.

We just feel that this is where God led us.” In December 2017, Hannah underwent the first phase of surgery to extract all of her teeth and do a major bone graft. She received provisional dentures, which she called her “starter teeth.”

After several months of healing, Hannah underwent the second phase of surgery in June to place the implants, the next step on her journey to a final prosthesis. Even in the midst of treatment, smiling is a thrill for this high school grad.

Dental Hygiene Students Sweep Competition

Caruth School of Dental Hygiene students achieved a milestone in February, sweeping all three places in the Texas Dental Hygienists’ Association informative research poster competition. “This year, TDHA limited the number of submissions per school to three.

Interestingly, we had five student groups interested in competing; a record high,” says Dr. Faizan Kabani, assistant professor and research course director in dental hygiene. All 30 second-year dental hygiene students participate in required research, and Kabani serves as primary mentor in addition to the faculty member assigned to each group.

“We had all decided, if anyone from our school places, that would be awesome in and of itself,” says Sydney Dennis ’18. “They announced third, and they announced second, and we looked at each other like, ‘This could be it.’ We were squeezing each other’s hands under the table. I heard the first word of our research title, and everyone started screaming.” b The achievement is one for the entire class – and dental hygiene program, for that matter – to enjoy.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 6

Dementia And Dental Care

For Those in the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, forgetting a routine dental appointment could be just the first misstep in an ongoing challenge to preserve oral health.

"Routine dental services often take a back seat when patients have other serious medical conditions,” says Dr. Peggy Timothé, assistant professor in public health sciences and director of the dental public health graduate program at Texas A&M College of Dentistry.

"Coordinating care with multiple providers is a challenge for many patients, as well as getting to and from the dentist.” As the disease progressively impacts cognition, other considerations surface once a patient is in the dental chair. Providers should attempt to seek trust and familiarity, says Dr. David Goydan, dental anesthesiologist and adjunct assistant professor in the college’s Advanced Education in General Dentistry program.

"Try to find a personal life event, experience or an interest to which the individual may respond,” he says. “You may find some connection resulting in a smile or a response with relative cognitive clarity. Surprisingly, you may have made their day … access to a pleasant experience may still be intact.”

Goydan, who has decades of experience practicing dental anesthesiology and general dentistry in the nursing care and hospital settings, recommends a behavioral cooperation assessment when deciding if sedation may be necessary for patients with dementia. “Determine if their behavior borders on being totally noncompliant, combative or docile.That’s a big consideration for dental treatment planning,” Goydan says. "Depending where the patient falls on this continuum, you can design an anesthetic to achieve patient cooperation within the boundaries of age, physical status and medical safety.”

The same is true for fine-tuning oral hygiene routines at home with caregivers. Patients in the early stages of dementia may simply need to be reminded to brush their teeth, whereas those in moderate stages may forgot how to use a toothbrush or why they need one at all.

"Family members can post pictures on the bathroom mirror or wall that demonstrate how to brush their teeth,” suggests Kathy Muzzin, clinical professor in the college’s Caruth School of Dental Hygiene. “After allowing the patient to brush their teeth, caregivers can provide follow-up care by brushing areas that the patient had difficulty reaching.”

In later phases of the disease, caregivers become responsible for the patient’s oral hygiene. One of the best tools to use at this juncture: a multi-head toothbrush, which cleans all surfaces of teeth at once. In situations in which noise doesn’t frighten the patient, an electric toothbrush is a viable option. Caregivers should establish a set time each day for mouth care and may need to adjust their expectations, as patients at this stage can become resistant.

"In these instances,” says Muzzin, “tooth brushing once a day may be a major accomplishment.”

Of Note

Not long after celebrating with the first student to complete the oral and maxillofacial radiology graduate program, Dr. Byron “Pete” Benson retired in August 2017.

This Regents Professor in diagnostic sciences and imaging center director was a driving force behind the program’s establishment in 2014 as one of only nine of its kind in the country.

In the mid-1990s he helped found the college’s imaging center and later participated in his specialty’s successful push for American Dental Association recognition.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 7

More Curious Findings In Gene Study

BY THE TIME its National Institutes of Health grant funding period commenced last year, one Texas A&M College of Dentistry research team already had made a surprising discovery: the presence of supernumerary teeth in animal models devoid of FAM20B, a gene necessary for cartilage development. The extra teeth occurred in addition to enamel mineralization changes.

Dr. Xiaofang Wang, assistant professor in biomedical sciences and principal investigator for the $1.8 million R01 grant, shared the significance of this finding with peers from across the country during a March symposium at the American Association for Dental Research/Canadian Association for Dental Research Annual Meeting in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

His studies on FAM20B began in 2014 with a hunch that the gene could impact tooth development, but his team’s findings were unexpected. The current five-year NIH funding allows Wang’s lab to study the signaling mechanism that underlies the formation of extra teeth.

“Clinically, the presence of supernumerary teeth is a bad thing, as they may cause many complications,” Wang says. “Scientifically, it is a good thing, because it reminds us that if we figure out the mechanism, we may use it to regenerate teeth and, of course, prevent supernumerary teeth.”

Collaborators include Dr. Robert Linhardt at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York; Dr. Ophir Klein at the University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry; the Stowers Institute in Kansas City, Missouri; and Dr. Rena D’Souza, associate vice provost for research at the University of Utah School of Dentistry.

While Wang is confident that findings will help advance understanding of molecular-level happenings regarding extracellular control of tooth formation, he also suggests a broader application. FAM20B appears to act as a catalyst for extracellular components known as proteoglycans, which help maintain signaling balance in tooth development.

Since proteoglycans are present in nearly all tissues, this could shed light on problematic conditions in multiple body systems. Take, for instance, limb and finger development, which Wang discussed at the symposium. Over the past year, his research team has found that FAM20B-catalyzed proteoglycans control the outgrowth of limb buds and segmentation of fingers.

He describes the interesting mechanism by which this occurs: Proteoglycans regulate the signaling hierarchy not of bone or cartilage cells themselves but of mesenchymal cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone and cartilage.

Dr. Phil Campbell, '71

Dr. Phil Campbell '71, "73 retired in fall 2017 from his position as department head of orthodontics and holder of the Robert E. Gaylord Endowed Chair.

A Hall of Fame member and Distinguished Alumnus, he was a key figure in the establishment of the college’s first endowed chair in the 1980s and served on the boards of the dental college, Baylor Oral Health Foundation and the Alumni Association.

Campbell joined the faculty full time in 2005 after retiring from private practice, continuing his advocacy for orthodontic research.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 8

Spotlight

on The Road Again, And Again …

Staff Member Kenneth Howell begins most workdays before the sun is up, helping Texas A&M College of Dentistry students and faculty take preventive dental care to the community. An outreach worker in public health sciences, Howell arrives at 6:15 a.m., though his day doesn’t technically start for another 45 minutes. He uses the extra time to make goodie bags for patients before prepping supplies and instruments and loading the Seal Mobile vans that transport these items to the elementary schools that are part of the college’s sealant initiative. Howell drives to each day’s location and then spends more than 30 minutes setting up portable dental operatories and supplies. Once the dental students arrive, he briefs them on the equipment and logistics for the day.

“If anything breaks down while we are onsite, I have to get it back in working order. I also make sure the school nurse has information for our pediatric dentistry program that she can give to parents,” he says.

After the last child is seen, Howell jumps into action again, disassembling the equipment and loading it in the van. Back at the dental school, he takes the dirty instruments to central sterilization. Every Seal Mobile detail, from oil changes to repairs and inspections, is this staff member’s responsibility. “During the summer, I continue to make deliveries to all the external clinics where we provide dental care, including Baxter- Crowley Agape Clinic and Dallas’ juvenile detention center,” Howell says.

He came to the dental school 12 years ago after retiring as a corrections officer with the Texas prison system. “My favorite part of this job is watching the kids get the dental services we provide,” Howell says. “Some of them are scared when they arrive, and the dental students and staff members are able to calm them down so they can get the care they need.

“There are times when we can’t get the children to calm down because they are too afraid or they’ve had a bad dental experience. But for the ones who go through the treatment process, to see them smile when they’re finished is one of the best feelings.”

Of Note

The Texas A&M University System Board of Regents awarded Dr. Dan Jones ’89, department head of public health sciences and director of curriculum, the Regents Professor designation in November 2017. Identifying and creating dental public health solutions for area residents is something he has pursued with systematic focus.

The department has received more than $36 million in grant revenue since 2000, which translates into much-needed dental care for underserved populations and educational experiences for the college’s students.

Dr. Ernie Lacy

Dr. Ernie Lacy ’94, ’96, associate dean for student affairs and student diversity, completed her first academic year in the role with an inherently challenging endeavor: pronouncing each graduate’s name as they crossed the commencement stage. It’s just one aspect of the office’s multifaceted work to support students and create lifelong partnerships with future dental professionals while participating in efforts that foster the continued admission of highly qualified students who reflect the state’s diversity.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 9

Word Of Mouth

Third Year Dental Student Lana Khazma is known for “Mouthing Off ” in a good way: sharing her voice through this American Student Dental Association blog as one of two electronic editors who serve on ASDA’s editorial board.

“It keeps me on my toes, and I want to be involved in my profession,” says Khazma, who in February started her position with the web publication, which reaches more than 24,000 dental students. “I also like to create my own content and see what I want to read in the magazine or on the blog – and get other people to be interested in that, too.”

It’s a collaborative process. Khazma, along with her co-editor, the editor-in-chief, and five editors of Contour magazine, jump at any chance to share ideas. By design, no two staffers on ASDA’s editorial board are from the same dental school.

“At the annual session in February we all just sat at a table for seven hours brainstorming. There’s a lot of back-and forth trying to figure out what works for each issue,” says Khazma. The editorial group solicits student writers from around the country who carefully craft each piece. “The stories are personal; they are really relatable to the people who are reading them,” says Khazma, who oversees several blog posts a week, identifying and finetuning ideas and working with writers throughout the process.

It's a substantial time commitment considering attendance at several national meetings is a requirement, but that didn’t stop more than 200 dental students nationwide from applying for ASDA’s 45 leadership positions this year. Khazma has additional demands on her time: As president of Texas A&M College of Dentistry’s ASDA chapter, she also is a delegate to ASDA’s District 9.

“It’s definitely unique,” she says of her national editorial board role. “There are a lot of things I didn’t know other dental students face. Everyone brings a different perspective to the table.”

Dr. Jack Long

For Dr. Jack Long ’76, who spent his entire career at the dental college, a heart for helping students achieve their career goals guided him for 41 years, including welcoming yet one more entering class before his fall 2017 retirement as associate dean for student affairs. From teaching fixed prosthodontics to recruiting potential students, directing the admissions and academic records office, then managing commencement and myriad other activities as associate dean, Long poured energy and dedication into his professional roles.

Dr. Eric Solomon

Dr. Eric Solomon, who spent 25 years at the college keeping an eye on dental education trends, retired in August 2017 as professor in public health sciences at the dental school and executive director of institutional research for Texas A&M University Health Science Center. His data collection and analysis expertise has been critical to legislative funding allocations and strategic planning. Solomon’s interpretations also have guided all levels of organized dentistry grappling with manpower and access-to-care concerns.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 10

A large decorative graphic

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 11

Pain Interrupted

by Jennifer E. Fuentes

Three patients share their stories

As Humans, we’re used to cycles. The repetition of schedules and even seasons is expected,
comforting even. After all, we are creatures of habit.

Sometimes, though, cycles can cause more harm than good. Such is the case with chronic pain.
Like the man who, after having several teeth restored with crowns, begins to notice pain in his mouth,
leading to a tightness in the facial muscles upon wakening. It eventually creeps along through the neck,
to the shoulders, down the back. And before he knows it, his entire posture has changed. The pain
continues, unabated, until he discovers the origin of his discomfort.

“Interrupting the ‘pain cycle’ is critical in managing a patient's pain,” says Dr. Steven Bender ’86,
director of the Clinical Center for Facial Pain and Sleep Medicine at Texas A&M College of Dentistry,
which was established in early 2016. “If pain gets bad or becomes chronic, it becomes much harder to

treat. If you can interrupt the pain or decrease the level of excitement of the central nervous system in some way, the ability to
then manage the pain becomes easier.”
Interrupting that pain cycle requires what Bender refers to as “multimodal” care. Several modalities may be employed,
ranging from medication to oral appliances to home care. In many circumstances, the treatment is surprisingly minimal.
“The human body is very adaptable. In most cases of pain in the head and face, it is best to provide the least amount of

treatment possible to help the system to adapt,” Bender says. “The research and our clinical experience support this.”
Arriving at a diagnosis – the starting point – is the hard part, especially in dentistry.
“We as a profession are very adept at identifying problems that are clinically evident and then providing very good mechanical

treatments,” says Bender. “However, in many cases of pain, you cannot see a clinically evident problem, so the diagnosis may be
a guess, and the traditional mechanical treatment approaches – which are, in some cases, excessive and unneeded – are often
tried unsuccessfully.”

To attain as accurate a diagnosis as possible, Bender spends more time talking with patients during their initial appointment
at the center than some health care providers spend with their patients over the course of several years. Initial appointments are
one and a half to two hours, and cookbook approaches to pain don’t work here. Since every person is a unique individual, no
two people experience pain in quite the same way, Bender says. Everything about a person defines how they experience pain.

For a revealing look behind the scenes, three patients share more about what living with head, neck and jaw pain was like for
them, and how Bender and his team helped stop the cycle.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 12

The Difference One Little Orthotic Can Make

Jon Terman didn’t really have to get that crown on his front tooth redone, per se. It wasn’t bothering him, and his teeth didn’t hurt, but it had outlived the typical lifespan for crowns by a wide margin. Terman, then 44, had the crown placed in his teens following a baseball accident. The dentist he saw kept encouraging him that it was time to make a change – after all, the metal crown made assessing the condition of the tooth underneath a challenge. Plus, it wasn’t looking particularly good. “The dentist I saw said it was going to be hard to match one tooth, so he suggested they match four,” explains Terman.

“He carefully treated me at each step in my recovery, and that has made all the difference.” — Jon Terman

“When they replaced the crown, I immediately started having all sorts of problems: first with my teeth, then my
bite and then jaw pain.” Thus began a vicious cycle.

“I’d go back, he’d adjust something, grind something and then wait a little longer, and I’d go back again,” Terman says. “I had constant pain from day one, and the more that was done, the worse it got.”

The source of the discomfort stemmed from those upper teeth, which, to Terman’s surprise, seemed to have moved. There was constant pain, shifting over time to where the upper and bottom teeth meet. His bottom lip sparked more irritation. Those changes in his bite created constant pain in his jaw and even more discomfort when he would eat or talk. His blood pressure spiked, and spasms in his jaw muscles combined with irregular breathing began to affect his sleep. Discouragement set in. Visits to several other dentists, specialists and surgeons ensued. Night guards were fabricated, but they only made matters worse.

“It caused not only physical pain but psychological pain,” Terman says. “I became critically aware of the chronic pain issue. It was very, very, tough.” The pain arced out from his mouth to his jaw to his neck, branched out along his shoulders and down his back. Eventually, his entire posture changed.

“I was suffering and nearly hopeless as things continued to spiral down, and it was affecting my whole life, including my family,” he says. One of the lowest points: When one dental specialist described Terman’s experience as “phantom pain.”

Terman, a neuroscientist at UT Southwestern, wasn’t buying it. He talked to his brother, a pain researcher at the University of Washington – and a past president of the American Pain Society – who did some digging. He came up with a name: Dr. Steven Bender. And separately, one of the dentists who treated Terman offered a glimmer of hope. “If the pain ever gets too bad,” he told Terman, “I know a guy.” Turns out that referral was for the same name he had received from his brother.

“I was at all these different places, with these different doctors, and I was like, ‘Can I find anybody who actually cares?’” Terman says. “I could immediately tell that Dr. Bender cared, and not only that, he was someone who had experience seeing patients with what I had.”

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 13

For Terman, who had by this point endured more than a year of constant pain, Bender’s initial treatment plan seemed alarmingly simple: Calm down the jaw through a custom-made night guard. There was gradual change in his jaw and face over that first month, and his blood pressure and sleep patterns began to improve. Following Bender’s recommendation to see a physical therapist, his back began to heal, and the shoulder and neck muscles that were hunched from pain started to release. It took more than a year and a half from that point – three years of pain in total – but Terman recovered. That was two years ago, and he continues to do well.

“As a scientist, I was asking questions, trying to understand; obviously the proof was in how I felt,” says Terman. “I am so thankful that something so devastating for me, that made me despair for my life, could be solved.

Dr. Bender recognizing my problem helped me turn the vicious cycle around with that orthotic and perhaps, most important, reassurance. There were no magical pills, procedures or exercises. He carefully treated me at each step in my recovery, and that has made all the difference. It was an answer to prayer.”

Fighting A Strong-willed Jaw


“The quality of life in general is greatly enhanced.” — Lucy Barnett

Lucy Barnett’s temporo- mandibular joint pain stretches back about as far as she can remember. She’s racked her brain to identify a root cause.

“I don’t know if my profession has anything to do with it or something that is innate, but I clench my teeth in my sleep,” says Barnett, a recently retired property crimes detective and 29year veteran of the Dallas Police Department.

It’s just something she’s always done. To stave off pain, her dentist built her appliances to wear at night. Barnett kept clenching – and breaking – every single one.

“One day I woke up and couldn’t open up my mouth even wide enough to get a fork in or a spoon to eat a bowl of cereal. My dentist flat told me at that point, ‘I can’t do anything for this. I don’t know what else to do, shy of sending you to an oral surgeon.’ I really didn’t even want to do that; I didn’t want to go the surgery route,” she says.

Instead, her dentist handed her a business card. On it was Bender’s name and office phone number.

“This was all out of pocket, but I was to the point that I had to do something,” Barnett says. So she filled out a barrage of forms, which Bender studied so closely it was as if he had read every pen stroke. She underwent extensive X-rays of her head, neck and jaw.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 14

It wasn’t long before Bender presented her with her first custom-made oral orthotic. These contraptions can range in price from $700 to $3,000.

“When I first got it, I thought, ‘I don’t understand how this is going to work,’” Barnett says. “It took the pressure off my jaw, and within 72 hours I noticed a difference. It wasn’t a miracle, it wasn’t instant, but everything started to calm down within about 72 hours.”

Even if Bender can’t prevent her from breaking her appliances, he can at least lengthen each one’s duration. In 10 years, he’s made her three. And when she comes in for her biannual appointments, they test – with, of all things, carbon paper – where she’s applying the most bite force. They then make the necessary adjustments to Barnett’s appliance and send her on her way.

“It’s made a huge difference,” Barnett says of the care she receives at the pain and sleep center. “The quality of life in general is greatly enhanced.” Eating is no longer hindered, and another bonus: Headaches are kept at bay.

Barnett’s appliance goes wherever she does. “I take it on vacation. I’ve taken some work trips and, when I fly, it goes with me; it doesn’t go in my checked luggage. It’s that important.”

Finding A Way To Sing Again


It’s Said That college is supposed to be one of the best times of your life. For Ashley Lamb, this wasn’t the case. Debilitating jaw pain kept her from living. “In church on Sunday mornings, everyone would be singing, except I wouldn’t be, because of my mouth,” Lamb recalls. “At work I would be talking to someone, and my jaw would lock up mid-sentence. That was difficult and embarrassing. I had to eat soft foods and, during office lunches, if they brought in pizza, I couldn’t eat it.”

She had a night guard from her dentist, but the jaw pain only intensified. It spread to her ears, even caused her to wonder if she had swimmer’s ear. Physical therapy didn’t seem to help, either. At that point, her family doctor prescribed muscle relaxers. They calmed the pain but made her sleep for 12-hour stretches.

“I would take it that Friday evening and sleep Saturday and Sunday, so that would help me through the week,” Lamb says. Finally, in 2007, just after Lamb got married, her doctor recommended a dentist who dealt only with head, neck and jaw pain. At the time, Bender ran a private practice in Plano.

“I was pretty terrified that he was going to tell me that I needed surgery,” says Lamb. “It was such a blessing, because after the full examination, he told me, ‘I have seen people way worse than you.’ I was just amazed.”

Bender began to make adjustments to the night guard, adding acrylic here, augmenting there. For a time, Lamb’s healing remained elusive.

“It was still a struggle for several months,” Lamb says. “I remember one time he was making adjustments, and I was still in a lot of pain, and I asked him, ‘Do I need to see a psychiatrist or something?’ He was so wonderful; he validated my pain, and he told me that I was not crazy.”

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 15

What he also did was give Lamb choices. While her dentist saw only two possibilities – make the night guard work or have surgery – Bender presented an arsenal of treatment options. With time, the pain stopped getting in the way of her life. Church once again became a place for Lamb to sing, and pizza lunches at work were no longer a source of anxiety.

“It’s not something I have to think about anymore,” says Lamb. “I wear the appliance at night, see Dr. Bender every six months. That’s it. It’s not, ‘Am I going to be able to talk? Am I going to be able to eat at this function?’

“I never dreamed that I could eat steak or pizza again, but I can.”

Walking Alongside Patients


Dr. Steven Bender ’86 has the credibility that comes from ‘walking the talk’: He’s lived through many of the same experiences as his patients in the Clinical Center for Facial Pain and Sleep Medicine. For 14 years, Bender practiced restorative dentistry. Frustrated by his own lifelong headaches and jaw pain, he began a quest for answers. It led Bender to a niche within dentistry: pain management for the head, neck, temporomandibular joints and oral cavity.

In 2000, after completing a mini-residency and a two-year preceptorship at what was then known as the Parker E. Mahan Facial Pain Center at the University of Florida, he dedicated his Plano, Texas, practice solely to patients suffering from these conditions. With the shift in focus came unique expertise and recognition. Bender has achieved fellowship status with the American Academy of Orofacial Pain, the American Headache Society and, in 2014, the American College of Dentists. By 2015, Bender had assumed the presidency of the American Academy of Orofacial Pain.

In 2016, he officially set up shop at Texas A&M College of Dentistry as director of its new pain and sleep center. Bender helped make the clinic a reality beginning in 2013, in large part through his willingness to work as a part-time volunteer faculty member at the dental school, seeing pain patients two mornings a month.

Helping to bridge that transition to the dental college with Bender is Program Coordinator Linda Brock, his assistant of more than 10 years. She schedules appointments, welcomes patients, prepares and sterilizes the exam room and, for new patients, gathers data and records the patient narrative. But her contributions go much further than that. In a sense, she walks alongside patients – as a medical assistant, counselor and friend – checking in on them in the days and weeks following their appointments, synthesizing details and getting a feel for what triggers their pain. Her role helps funnel information to Bender and further sustain patient care.

“Linda is probably most known for her faith and her willingness to share a message of hope to all she meets,” says Bender. “I often think that our patients come primarily to visit with Linda and not me!”

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 16

If You Build It

by Carolyn Cox

A short walk from the Texas A&M College of Dentistry's main building, its long awaited Clinic and Education building ascends, the construction-site tower cranes commingling with at least a dozen others that hover over the downtown Dallas environs like metallic arachnids.

The new structure’s walls will encompass more modernization than meets the eye on its detailed blueprints. A curriculum redesign is part and parcel of the change in clinical location.

“We are at a critical point right now in executing our mission to educate the next generation of oral health professionals,” says Dr. Lawrence Wolinsky, dean.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 17

“This new facility represents an important step forward in our ability to meet the future needs of both patients and dental education.”

A “group practice” curriculum model is the equally weighty but less tactile project arising in tandem with the new building, aimed at enhancing critical thinking and patient-centered care. The coordinated timing of these two monumental tasks – building construction and curriculum change – is not mere coincidence.

“Our new building will be eye-catching, but its biggest Griffin active from the beginning. Focused preparations plus is how its features were designed around the concept of the new curriculum,” says Dr. Steve Griffin ’85, associate dean for clinical affairs, who is overseeing the building project as chair of the Dental Education Facility Task Force. Plans for a new structure are 14 years in the making, with intensified in early 2014.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 18

Alone No More


Anyone Who Lays Eyes on the current building’s third-floor dental clinic experiences the “wow” factor of the sea of pale blue dental chairs stretching more than half the length of a football field. Less apparent to the eye is the impact of this arrangement on educational methods: The confined space within each operatory limits collaboration.

In the new building, clinical care will occur among groups of students organized in six general practice “pods,” each consisting of 21 to 24 operatories. Increased square footage around each dental chair will accommodate two or more people – students at various levels of training and faculty members – rendering one-on-one patient visits a thing of the past. Students will be assigned to one of these groups when they enter dental school.

An eye-level view of clinical teaching helps Dr. Jennifer Barrington, clinical associate professor in general dentistry, D4 comprehensive care program director and a group leader for 18 fourth-year dental students, anticipate the impact of this team approach.

“We plan to have first-year involved in direct patient care very early.” — Dr. Jennifer Barrington

The new practice model also includes integrating dental hygiene students,” says Barrington, one of 20 faculty members and administrators serving on the college’s Curriculum Task Force. She will lead a pilot group of 12 dental students in the new educational model during the coming year.

On the clinic floor, conversations that occur routinely between clinical faculty and students about how to manage a patient’s care or the pros and cons of material choices and techniques could reach an even broader set of students in the new clinical facility, she explains.

“In our new group practice model, I can imagine we might have a brief morning session with a clinically relevant theme: whitening methods and materials that are safe and effective for our patients, or the benefits of endodontic treatment vs. extraction and fixed restorative or implant placement,” Barrington says. “There are many ways we could integrate evidence-based dentistry discussions in the clinic.”

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 19

A Growing Trend In Education


Wolinsky, a Commission on Dental Accreditation site visitor consultant in addition to his role as dean, observes the national movement in dental education toward this integrated model rather than one organized around patient procedure “silos.”

“Most contemporary dental schools are going toward group practice models in some variation, where they are teaming students together with a faculty manager and have specialists coming into the practice,” he says. “This results in more efficient care under time constraints, which benefits patients but also provides very effective opportunities for peer training by students.”

Texas A&M College of Dentistry’s regional counterparts, the dental schools in Houston and San Antonio, use group practice models. As is the case in Dallas, the opening of Houston’s new building in 2012 coincided in large part with this curriculum shift. San Antonio’s new clinical facilities in 2015 were built after its group practice model was introduced but were designed to support it, according to Griffin.

CODA emphasizes a patient-centered environment and evidence-based dentistry in evaluating accreditation excellence, Griffin says.

“They are not mandating group practices to achieve those two things,” he explains. “But this group model will allow us to better track outcomes on a student who goes through our program. There will be a faculty member who will have a clinical knowledge of that student from beginning to end.”

“We’ll also have the most advanced technology we can get at this time, including rooms set up for CAD/CAM and 3D printing.” — Dr. Steve Griffin

For patients, the arrangement results in enhanced continuity of care.

“Rather than moving from department to department if they need specialty care or going from one student to another when one graduates, they will remain in that ‘private-practice’ setting,” Griffin explains. “We’ll also have the most advanced technology we can get at this time, including rooms set up for CAD/CAM and 3D printing.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 20

More Than A Passing Score


There’s An Additional Stimulus driving this curriculum change, faculty members say: the new Integrated National Board Dental Exam, which every dental student in the country soon will have to pass in order to apply for licensure.

Texas A&M College of Dentistry’s fall 2019 entering dental class will be its first to take the new exam, which will replace the two separate ones currently used to assess students’ biomedical and clinical sciences knowledge – one taken after the first 12 months of dental school and the other in the fourth year. The integrated exam will be case based, with students evaluated simultaneously on clinical knowledge and the supporting basic science.

Curriculum changes stand to give students an edge on this new requirement, say proponents, as the Curriculum Task Force is charged with achieving “vertical” and “horizontal” integration within the dental academic experience. The first entails two aspects: basic sciences taught as a foundation for clinical work, and the assimilation of all student class levels into the clinic. Horizontal integration throughout the basic and clinical sciences is designed to better synthesize knowledge transfer to students.

With co-chairs Dr. Paul Dechow, associate dean for academic affairs; Dr. Dan Jones ’89, department head of public health sciences and director of curriculum; and Grifffin, the task force is exploring ways to combine existing curriculum components.

Just what could this look like in the clinic and classroom?

“We’re looking to integrate science courses in ways that are application based and then pull in the clinical element to see how it works together,” Griffin says. “So, just one example, ‘What are the cellular characteristics of a particular disease, how do you identify them and then how do you diagnose the disease in a patient?’”

Without a doubt, the level of detail required for integrating basic sciences and clinical care throughout the four-year dental curriculum is daunting. The current arrangement, largely compartmentalized by class year, was last modified significantly in the 1990s. However, courses have been added over the past decade to strengthen student proficiency in evidence- based dentistry.

“It’s a very challenging process to fully integrate our curriculum,” says Wolinsky, “but it’s necessary to better prepare our students for the new board exam. It’s important they understand how basic science relates to their clinical care of a patient. From my perspective, that’s why dental education is moving that direction on a national level.”

At stake is an outstanding board pass rate, whether that means the clinical licensing exam or the integrated board exam,

Starting From The Ground Up: October 23, 2017

Texas A&M representatives, state elected officials and other dignitaries turned dirt at a mid-morning site dedication attended by hundreds of students, faculty, staff and friends for the college's new Clinic and Education Building. With Nussbaumer Street closed to traffic, a 180-foot tent accommodated a stage, seating and catered barbecue lunch.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 21

Barrington says. Success hinges on the details, she adds, and the process must be collaborative to succeed.

“Our new clinical floor plan is designed around an integrated model. The team approach among students of all levels in the clinic will help blend their didactic learning with the clinical curriculum,” says Barrington. “I remind myself, ‘Here’s where we are now; here’s where we are going.’ That helps me stay focused on the ultimate goal.

“We’re headed toward a well-rounded scenario that will be good for both students and patients. It will increase students’ clinical experiences and training, all with the goal of graduating the most highly skilled, prepared practitioners.”

Taking Clinics To The Next Level


The Construction Boom is not unique to north Texas or its dental school.

Among 76 dental schools in the U.S. and Canada, at least eight are currently building or planning significant projects, and another three completed a major project in the past two years, clinical affairs, and Larry Schnuck from Kahler Slater, BRW to design the college’s new building.

Texas’ dental schools in Houston and San Antonio opened new clinical facilities in 2012 and 2015, respectively.

Texas A&M College of Dentistry’s nine-story, 157,756-square-foot building is scheduled to open for patient care in January 2020. It’s the first freestanding structure built for the dental school since 1950, though current facilities have benefited from a major footprint addition and multiple renovations during the past 68 years.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 22

In Touch With Alumni

Students Say Second Career Professor Is A First-rate Mentor


Adjunct Faculty Roles at Texas A&M College of Dentistry and the University of Texas at Dallas give Dr. David Murchison ’80 an unusual vantage point for the dental education “circle of life.”

Murchison’s predental students who go on to dental school say his impact extends far beyond his faculty role.

“The one word that comes to my mind when I think about Dr. Murchison is ‘selfless’– selfless with his actions, his time and his attitude,” says second-year dental student Jennifer Dinh, who took Murchison’s oral histology class as a predental student at UTD, later serving as his teaching assistant. “He served not only as a role model and mentor but as an encourager and believer.”

Third-year dental student Fareed Ighani describes his attention as a “positive force” in the application process: calming nerves, offering advice, even educating students on etiquette for the all-important dental school interview.

It was in 2010 after a 30-year career in the Air Force that Murchison began teaching aspiring dentists, first at UTD’s undergraduate level and then at the professional level through the dental school’s Department of Diagnostic Sciences, where he works with students in the Oral Diagnosis Clinic.

“Recently I was staffing a D4, D3 and D2 student and asked a question about the character of the surrounding bone in treatment planning for prosthodontic care,” Murchison recalls. “The D2 immediately had the answer to the question I posed. I asked where he had learned it: ‘In your class at UTD.’ That is truly a satisfying part of my job.”

He also directs advanced dental materials courses for orthodontic and prosthodontic graduate students and serves as the civilian consultant in restorative dentistry and dental materials to the Air Force Surgeon General.

Graduate education was a major part of Murchison’s military assignments, which means some former students are now well into their dental careers. In fact, two of his Air Force residents are faculty members at the college: Dr. Diane Flint in diagnostic sciences and Dr. Lolo Wong in pediatric dentistry.

Memories, Laughter For 50-year Caruth Class

When The Dental Hygiene Class Of 1967 gathered for a 50th reunion in September 2017, conversation highlights ranged from humorous to inspirational to eyebrow-raising.

Nearly every time the tour of 12 reuniongoers rounded a corner of Texas A&M College of Dentistry, someone – or something – evoked a memory.

“We didn’t sit. We stood,” Margaret Hicks remarked as the alumni breezed through the dental hygiene clinic, where students were treating each other in preparation for patient care.

“We had Dr. David Murchison with students (from left) Fareed Ighani, Nida Suleman and Jennifer Dinh. belt-driven handpieces,” she recalled. “When the children came, we would put cotton on it, and they thought it was a rabbit.”

That image brought to mind the unfortunate fate of one dental student’s toupee when he leaned in just a bit too close to the contraption. The story made the rounds among dental and dental hygiene students alike during that time, and today it still prompts laughter.

1967 graduates: Dorthy Holmes McKearin, Nancy Pollen Dodson, Carol Setterberg Mast, Mary Kay
Vann Shank, Margaret Knebel Hicks, Linda Ross Olson, Miki McDonald Eggbrecht, Janet Price Bramlett, Mary
Alice Crook Fager and Diane Bray Hawk, Rosalie Wolf Griffin, Bette Buchanan.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 23

In Touch With Alumni

Distinguished Alum Blazes An Uncommon Path

Dianna Prachyl, '94, '00 might never have become a dental hygienist had it not been for an invitation extended almost in passing.

She was on her front porch when Pat Campbell, now executive director of the Caruth School of Dental Hygiene at Texas A&M College of Dentistry, invited her to tour the school. Prachyl, 2017 recipient of the college’s Distinguished Alumnus Award, was on a pre-nursing path at the time, she and Campbell had sons in the same Cub Scouts den, and their relationship wasn’t one that revolved around work.That was more than 25 years ago.

“I had not even thought of dental hygiene as a career until that moment,” she says.

Prachyl earned her bachelor’s in dental hygiene in 1994, but it was just a few years later when her career took an uncommon turn. The dental hygiene master’s degree program at the College of Dentistry had recently been approved, and students could choose between an education or administrative track. Although Prachyl had taught at Caruth in those initial years after graduating, the concept of health care administration appealed to her.

It’s a move that has taken her on a path not often traveled by others in her field, beginning at Children’s Health in Dallas, where an initial role overseeing the dental clinic led to director- level positions in ambulatory services, to a different leadership opportunity in Fort Worth with John Peter Smith Health Network more than five years ago.

As senior vice president of community health, she oversaw dozens of clinics – dental, medical, outpatient, school-based and specialty – across Tarrant County. In her current role as chief operating officer of Acclaim Physician Group, she coordinates education and research initiatives between JPS and Tarrant County health care providers.

When it comes to sharing advice on how up-and-coming dental hygienists can diversify their own careers, Prachyl offers this wisdom: “Be very aware of your career and where it’s going.You own your career development as an individual.That’s the advice I give every student.

“The better prepared you are, the easier it will be to go on that journey.”

50 Years And More Than A Few Stories Later


Long after their dinner’s scheduled start time, members of the Dental Class of 1967 lingered in the Royal Oaks Country Club lobby, too excited to see friends making their way up the staircase for their 50th reunion to ponder the spread waiting for them in the dining room.

A microphone pass during the September 2017 dinner prompted most of the 35 classmates present to stand and tell a story, give thanks, say hello or even sing a song. Approximately 60 individuals including spouses and guests attended.

The evening included fond tales about classmates who could not be present and a roll call and moment of silence for deceased members.

“We all agreed we were the best class ever,” Dr. Terry Watson shared during the campus tour the following day. “We bonded through the pressures of dental school. It meant so much to have the class together again.”

Join Us In Dallas


AUG. 24, 2018
Caruth School of Dental
Hygiene Luncheon

SEPT. 7, 2018
Alumni Homecoming and
General Membership Meeting

JAN. 18, 2019
Special Alumni CE Course
101 Endodontics: Lecture and Lab

Visit https://dentistry.tamhsc.edu/alumni/ for details.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 24

In Touch With Alumni

Bond Still Strong Nearly Seven Decades Later


As Students, Most Members of the Dental Class of 1951 were fresh from World War II and earning their education by using the GI Bill.Their experiences during the war as well as the ups and downs of dental school cemented their friendships, which have lasted all these years.

Texas A&M College of Dentistry’s homecoming festivities in September 2017 provided the perfect backdrop for this gathering of friends. Seven class members, most in their mid- 90s, traveled from across Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi for a weekend of fun and reminiscing.

“There were 12 class members still living out of a class of 60, but one passed away just last week,” said Dr. Blair Jones ’83, who drove from Mansfield to Sweetwater,Texas, to bring his father, Dr. Zane Jones, to the reunion. “Their class is unusually close.”

Many had not returned to campus since they graduated, so part of their weekend events included a tour and a visit with Dean Lawrence Wolinsky. After a morning reception, the alumni walked through clinics, labs and classes, where they received “welcome back” greetings from faculty members and students.

They were amazed with the technology updates that have occurred since they graduated dental school, such as lecture capturing software, Camtasia, which allows students to view faculty lectures at their leisure.

“We needed that Camtasia back when our daughter was born,” said Eleanor Baldridge, the wife of Dr. Doyle Baldridge.Their daughter was born on the first day of dental school. It was a month before Baldridge got a break to return to Conway, Arkansas, to see his new baby.

Elaine Simmons, the spouse of deceased 1951 alumnus Dr. Joe Simmons Jr. and mother of Alumni Association President Dr. Joe Simmons III ’98, ’99, coordinated the reunion and is considered an honorary class member. She has helped facilitate communication among group members since their graduation.

BOHF Now Accepting Alumni Association Payments Online

Baylor Oral Health Foundation is now offering its donors the convenience of online Giving, creating a new avenue for alumni support.

With just a few clicks via the BOHF website, alumni can become Active Members of the Texas A&M College of Dentistry Alumni Association, one of many funds that BOHF manages. Monetary support of the association underwrites alumni services and activities ranging from class reunions and online job listings to graduation awards and white coat ceremonies. As always, the focus is on current and future alumni.

“We represent all of our alumni, whether you’re a graduate of Baylor University College of Dentistry, Texas A&M College of Dentistry or any name in between,” says Dr. Joe J. Simmons III ’98, ’99, association president.

A priority is to encourage more alumni to become Active Members – alums who financially support the association – and to increase their involvement. The association also is partnering with the college’s Continuing Education Office to provide targeted training for recent graduates and discounted CE for Active Members.

To contribute online, go to bohf.org and click on the “Donate Online” button. Choose an amount or type one in and select the Alumni Association as your designation.

For more information, call
214.828.8214 or email dentalalumni@dentistry.tamhsc.edu.
Dental Class of 1951

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 25

In Touch With Alumni

Career Path Brings Alumna Full Circle


DR. LAVERN HOLYFIELD, '77 didn’t choose her path to dental education. Rather, it chose her. “As much as I enjoy practicing, I realized early in my career that I wanted to teach,” says Holyfield, who taught part time for several years in the mid-1980s, though she didn’t join the faculty full time until the late 1990s.

She and classmate Dr. Jerry Lewis Mathis were the first African- American students accepted at the dental college 44 years ago.

“I understood the significance of this milestone,” recalls Holyfield, now director of diversity and faculty development in the Office of Academic Affairs, in which she oversees faculty orientation seminars and the I.D.E.A. Science Center.

In Holyfield’s early faculty days, her volunteer efforts on what was then the Welcoming Diversity Committee sparked this focus when she joined the ranks of colleagues such as Dr. Marvin Hirsh, a visionary she describes as “passionate about respect and fair treatment for all.” The committee provided diversity workshops for students, and as demand for this training grew, Holyfield even traveled to other dental schools to present the material.

With time, the American Dental Association’s Commission on Dental Accreditation also recognized the need for such cultural competence training, and Holyfield was primed to take the lead on such matters at the College of Dentistry.

I.D.E.A. seeks to extend the emphasis on inclusion beyond the students to the entire college community.

“It became my personal mission to help make the college a more accepting and inclusive environment,” says Holyfield. “I truly enjoy being here, and it is my goal to help make sure that all faculty, staff, students and patients feel welcome and respected.”

Alumni Capture Teaching Awards

Texas A&M College of Dentistry alumni have captured students’ esteem – and every Teacher of the Year award – for two years running.

Encouragement, constructive feedback, dedication, patience, respect, a passion for teaching and the habit of going “above and beyond” are all attributes cited for this recognition.

Honorees for 2018 are Keri Pearson ’92, adjunct assistant professor in dental hygiene; Dr. Stephen McDonald ’80, clinical assistant professor in restorative sciences; and Dr. Amp Miller III ’73, ’80, professor in restorative sciences.

In 2017 the awards went to Dr. George Cramer ’75, clinical associate professor in restorative sciences; and Dr. Loulou Moore ’93, ’94, also clinical associate professor.

A common thread among recipients: their appreciation for students’ enthusiasm and energy. “Teaching young people and working with those who really desire to be the best they can be is what I like most about teaching,” says Cramer.

The Alumni Association presents the awards annually to recipients selected by the student body. Teachers of the Year carry the college’s mace and centennial baton during commencement and are presented with a monetary award and a crystal apple.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 26

Giving

Rees Endowed Chair To Advance Renowned Center


Thanks To The generosity of individual and corporate donors, the $1 million Dr.Terry Rees Endowed Chair in Stomatology will soon be advancing patient care, education and research in stomatology at Texas A&M College of Dentistry.

The chair honors Rees ’68 (Perio), who was professor and director of the college’s Stomatology Center from its founding in 1984 to his retirement in 2017. Established through grants from the Dallas-based Hoblitzelle Foundation, the center is still one of only a handful in the U.S.

Original grant-seeking visionaries included Dr.William Hurt, then professor and chair of periodontics; Dr.William Binnie, then professor and chair of pathology; and Dr. Alan Menter, a dermatologist affiliated with Baylor University Medical Center.

When fully funded, the endowed chair will bolster the center’s clinical research and staffing, initially through the appointment of a new director to propel its work in investigating, diagnosing and treating rare and debilitating mouth problems.

“We deliver potentially life-saving diagnoses and procedures for patients and want to be sure that continues,” says Rees, who has seen the center impact at least 8,500 patients from around the country and many parts of the world. “The Stomatology Center is a referral, training and research site for managing difficult oral medicine/periodontics cases and enhancing treatment outcomes through innovation.”

When Rees retired, an opportunity to recognize his accomplishments and commitment to patients and students sparked new contributions that augmented the existing Terry Rees Fellowship in Stomatology/Periodontics to reach a $500,000 funding level.This qualified it for matching funds from the Texas A&M University Office of the President. The fellowship had been established in 2012 through a gift from Dr. Bettye Whiteaker-Hurt ’68, ’70 (Perio) to the Baylor Oral Health Foundation to assist the center with enhancing stomatology expertise among dental professionals.

“In talking to periodontists around the country, I can’t tell you how many of them are addressing stomatology concerns in their practices every day,” Rees says. “I’d like to see us continue to extend opportunities for stomatology training to all of our undergraduate and graduate dental students.”

Patient Everett Lee, whom Rees treated for 14 years for graft vs. host disease following a stem cell transplant to fight leukemia, is a grateful Stomatology Center beneficiary.

“I had been through so many specialists, and you took me under your wing and helped me navigate all the problems I had in taking care of my mouth,” he said at Rees’ retirement reception. “I am unquestionably grateful.”

“Grateful” captures the emotion shared by those who know Rees and honor his determination to help ensure the Stomatology Center has the resources to continue as a hallmark of periodontics and oral medicine.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 27

Honoring The Legacy: More Than Just A Name


Beth Daniel Voorhees '80 (DH) can still remember the first time she saw her husband, Dr. Fred Voorhees ’77, ’82, then an oral and maxillofacial surgery graduate student. Or rather, the first time he saw her.

“I was having a procedure done by Dr. Byrd, the oral surgery department chair,” says Voorhees, who at the time was in her first year of dental hygiene school. Ever resourceful, Fred found her name on her chart, asked a dental student friend for her number, called her up and asked if she wanted to go to a Halloween party.

“I remember calling my mom and telling her I was going out with this guy on a blind date, and that I was going to break the date,” Voorhees says. “My mom said, ‘No, you can’t break it; your father and I met on a blind date.’”

A few days later, Voorhees found herself at the downtown bus station, intercepting the Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm costumes her mom had lovingly fashioned for the soon-to-be couple and thrown onto a bus from Hot Springs, Arkansas, bound for Dallas.

“It was the most fun party,” Voorhees recalls. “We were nonstop after that.” The two married the next year, before they graduated.

It’s just one of many poignant memories for Voorhees that transpired at what is now Texas A&M College of Dentistry. She was a teenager when her father, Dr. Robert Guinn Daniel ’53, ’70 – who had for years maintained a successful general dentistry practice in Hot Springs, Arkansas – fulfilled a lifelong dream of becoming an orthodontist by completing the graduate program at what was then known as Baylor University College of Dentistry. He wasn’t the only one in his family to frequent the college during those years.

“I spent a lot of time walking the halls and clinic and got to know the instructors who were here,” she recalls. “And so eight years later, I returned as a dental hygiene student. A lot of the instructors and staff I had gotten to know were still here. It was like going back home to me.”

Same, too, for her brother, Dr. John Daniel ’87. And now the Voorhees’ son, Dr. Daniel Voorhees ’18.

“I think for Daniel it was really important for him to go here because of the legacy,” says Voorhees. “The first thing he did when he got to the school was find his dad’s, uncle’s and grandfather’s composite photos.

“For Daniel to hear compliments on his grandfather and his dad, it was really meaningful for him to be a part of that. For our entire family, the legacy has been important.”

As this year’s graduation neared and construction on the college’s new Clinic and Education Building progressed, the Voorhees and Beth’s mother, Mary, contributed a $25,000 gift to name an operatory in memory of Beth’s father. A gift from her brother named a resident study area in their father’s memory.

“My dad was always proud that dentistry stayed in our family. I just can’t say enough about how much the school means to us. This has been a way to remember my dad and honor people who had a real influence on our lives while we were there, both as dental professionals and human beings,” says Voorhees.

“Despite the name change, we feel that the college has had a tradition of producing really excellent clinical dentists, and we want that tradition to continue.”

To learn more about Giving opportunities for the Clinic and Education Building, contact Melissa Ogden, director of development, at 214.828.8449 or mogden@txamfoundation.com.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 28

Giving

Gift Report

The Gift Of Time - 2018 Volunteer Faculty Members And Guest Lecturers

The college thanks these dedicated individuals who share their time and expertise without compensation to serve students.

Hoda Abdellatif
Raed Ajlouni
Pat Allen
Tarip Alsmadi
Brad Amendt
Steven Anderson
Maria Anderson
Mehrnaz Tahmasbi Arashlow
Pranesh Aswath
Justin Aurbach
Murat Ayik
Suman Bathina
Antonio Berto
Jonathan Blansett
Bonnie Bloom
Cathy Blunk
Jimmy Boley
Campbell Bourland
Chad Capps
Lauren Carney
Robert Cederberg
Thomas Choate
Marco Cueva
Lindsey Cummings
Barry Currey
Beth Davis
Herman Dumbrigue
Mohammed Elsalanty
Fallah Pooria
Rick Finnell
Pedro Franco
David Genecov
Grant Gilliland
Mark Glover
Marshall Goldberg
Cynthia Green
Susan Gunn
Tracy Hallman
Kenneth Hargreaves
Stacy Harper
Jianing He
Brittany Henderson
Larry Herwig
Frank Higginbottom
Nathan Hodges
Aarnoud Hoekema
Kelly Hughey
Laurie Inglis
Haroon Ismaili
Jae Ha Jung
Nobuhiro Kamiya
Habib Khalilkhani
Harry Kim
Collin Kraus
Vernon Krueger
John Lee
Dan Lewis
Aaron Lewis
Deborah Loth
Jason Luse
David Martinez
Randi Martin-Peters
Tom McKinney
Chris Miller
Robert Morgan
Nitia Morris
Jeff Moss
Preeti Naik
Phillip Newton
Michael Oppedisano
Ashley Orynich
Ketan Parekh
Robert Peak
Stacy Pettit-Redden
William Phillips
Jeff Pope
Leslie Pryor McIntosh
Hedley Rakusin
Michael Ramsay
Michael Ray
Michael Reed
Gregory Reed
Melissa Reese
Roy Rinkle
Kelly Romans
Kenneth Salyer
Mikhail Samchukov
Randy Sanovich
Jenny Scott
Meredith Scott
Shahrooz Seifikar
Harold Simpson
Vladimir Spolsky
Robert Steckler
Don Steinberg
Annette Stevenson
Ron Stukalin
Aaron Swapp
Esther Tam
Venu Varanasi
Ryan Walsh
William Walstad
Fen Wang
Debbie Wilkerson
Tom Wilson
Carl Wirth
Annette Wolf
Larry Wolford
Michael Womble

Public Health Clinic Volunteer Dentists


Robert L. Allen
Charles Arcoria
Santiago Batres
Elizabeth Berry
Jason Berry
Eric Braunlin
Dallas Dill
Mike Fisher
Russell Owens
Rene Rosas
James Shadle
John Sunnucks
James Theken
Francisco Vargas

Private Practice Preceptors


Jiro Akpobome
J. Moody Alexander
Chris Barnes
Todd Baumann
F.R. Boyles
Ben Bratcher
Brittany Bunch
Marco Caballeros
Jose Cazares
Parvatham Chandrashekar
Jon Clemetson
Ben Curtis
Joey de Graffenried
Valerie Drake
Sean Fitzgerald
Jan Gonzalez
Karen Gott
Avish Haria
Tommy Harrison
Jay Herrington
Larry Herwig
Joe Johnson
Susan Jolliff
Greg Kerbel
Reena Kuba
Laura Spencer LaCroix
Jay Leftwich
Layla Lohmann
Jeff Ludlow
G. Robert Marye
Donna Miller
Kimberly Neiman
Junior Osinde
Amanda Phan
Steven Pratt
Sam Preece
Anil Reddy
Michael Reed
Candalaria Rodriguez
Joan Santiago
Ray Scott
James Shadle
Howard Shayne
Mary Lynn Shayne
Eugene Silvertooth
Carmen Smith
Audrey Stansbury
Glenn Stern
Thad Taylor
Sheena Thomas
Cathy Tran
Kimberly Travers
David Trevino
Diep Truong
Drew Vanderbrook
Saskia Vaughan
Tammy Weyandt
Jon Williamson
Anna Willison

Gift Report


Texas A&M College of Dentistry is grateful for the financial support it receives from loyal and diverse constituencies.

These gifts represent tangible and lasting means of assuring that the college’s quest for excellence continues. This gift report includes donations to Texas A&M Foundation, Texas A&M College of Dentistry, Baylor Oral Health Foundation and the Alumni Association, reported by calendar year.

Not included in these listings are competitively awarded grants and contracts managed through the Texas A&M Research Foundation. Every effort has been made to make each list complete and accurate, but inevitably some errors or omissions may have occurred. We would appreciate receiving corrections, comments or questions.

Please direct concerns to the Office of Advancement, Communications & Alumni Relations at 214.828.8214. You also may contact this office for information on ways to continue your support of the college and its mission. We heartily thank our alumni, faculty, staff, students, friends and members of the corporate and foundation communities for their generosity and commitment to the college.

Texas A&M College of Dentistry/Texas A&M Foundation Contributors


The mission of the Texas A&M Foundation is to unite generosity and vision to raise and manage major philanthropic gifts that support the future of Texas A&M University.

Gifts made to TAMF in support of the College of Dentistry support the construction and equipping of the new Clinic and Education Building; endowed scholarships, professorships and chairs; and clinical and biomedical research.

2017

$1,000,000 OR MORE

Baylor Oral Health Foundation

$100,000—$499,999

Dr. Murat Ayik & Dr. Antonio Berto Mr. Ralph and Joy Ellis
Dr. Delores Gardner, Aunt of
Ms. Angela Hickman
Dr. Kay Lee
Dr. Lawrence E. Wolinsky

$50,000—$99,999

Dr. Michael Ellis
Dr. D. Brockaway Lynn
Dr. Loulou Moore
Nobel Biocare
Mr. Erle and Alice Nye
Osteogenics Biomedical
Dr. Helena Tapias and
Mr. Walter Zimmerman

$25,000—$49,999

Dr. John A. Daniel
Dr. Penelope Rasekh Drayer
Dr. Alton McWhorter
Dr. Joe J. Simmons III and
Mrs. Elaine Simmons
Dr. Amerian Sones
Dr. Mohsen Taleghani
Dr. John M. Wright

$10,000—$24,999

KLS Martin
Dr. Jill Peterson

$5,000—$9,999

Dentsply Sirona Endodontics
Dr. Diane J. Flint

$1,000—$4,999

American Dental Partners Foundation Dr. Jennifer Barrington
Drs. Vikas and Sujata Bhushan Carus Dental
Dr. Yi Shing Cheng
Delta Dental
Dentsply
Dr. Bernard Hennessy
Dr. Kelly Kofford
Dr. Hui Liang
Dr. Danette McNew-Hovenden
Dr. Madhu Nair
Ms. Lynice Norlock
North Texas Endodontic Associates North Texas Hispanic Dental
Association
Dr. Paras Patel
Procter & Gamble
TAMU Class of 2017
Quality Aspirators

$500—$999

Dr. Payal Bahn
Bien Air Dental
Colgate Speakers Bureau
Dr. Mark S. Geller
Hispanic Student Dental
Association
Dr. Bob C. Hunsaker
Dr. John Ross Stooksberry

$250—$499

McReynolds Orthodontics, LLC

Up to $249

Alliance of the Dallas County Dental
Society
Dr. Robert A. Baker
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Boyd
Dr. Oksana Budinskaya
Mr. and Mrs. Jim and June Copeland Dr. Frank Moore
Ms. Jill W. Morgan
Ms. Kim W. Rexford
Ms. Dorothy L. Walker
Young Dental

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 29

Giving

In-Kind Contributions

A-dec, Inc
American Orthodontics
Dr. Byron Benson
Nobel Biocare
Ortho Organizers
Straumann USA, LLC

Gifts in Memory of:

Dr. Stanley Ashworth
Dr. R.G. "Guinn" Daniel
Mrs. Clara Hoffman
Dr. Kevin Lee
Dr. David Lynn
Dr. Roland Lynn
Dr. M. Dee Ogden

Gifts in Honor of:

Dr. Nancy W. Burkhart
Dr. Paul C. Dechow
Dr. Francisco “Paco” Rivera
Dr. Terry Rees
Dr. Mohsen Taleghani

2016

$1,000,000 or more

Baylor Oral Health Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Winder

$100,000—$999,999
Nobel Biocare

$10,000—$99,999

KLS Martin
Dr. Phuong Nguyen and Mr. Cameron Tom

$5,000—$9,999

Dr. Linda Niessen
North Texas Endodontics Northwestern Mutual

$1,000—$4,999

American Dental Partners
Foundation Orapharma
SSC - Crothall Healthcare
North Texas Hispanic Dental Association
Delta Dental Insurance Company
Southwestern Society of Orthodontists
Ruth Riley Swords Scholarship
GlaxoSmithKline
Quality Aspirators
American Dental Education Association

$500—$999

Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity
Colgate Speakers Bureau
Hispanic Student Dental Association
J. Anthony Kososki DDS
Dr. Helena Tapias

$250—$499

Ms. Frankie Lou Hansen
Ms. Betty N. Ferraro
Dr. Christie S. Lee
Dr. Paul Edward Menton
Student National Dental Association
Fluellen Family Dentistry
Dr. Sterling Schow

Up to $249

Mrs. Mary Ellen Laursen
Mrs. John Shaw Curry
Ms. Pamela Wade
Dr. Frank Moore
Ms. Carolyn Bower
Dr. Mark Denny
Ms. Joyce Gill
Dr. Thomas Jeter
Dr. Clay Pickering
Dr. Keith J. Stewart
Dr. Anh T. Tran
Huey & Leeanna Bartlett
Psi Omega
Ms. Rebecca Complin
Ms. Judy Martinez Helbing
Dr. Luis R. Campana
Ms. Maureen Calhoon
Ms. Diane Christopher
Ms. Lana Crawford
Ms. Suzanne R. Davis
Robert J. & Linda M. Dollenger
Ms. Sharon Jones
Ms. Adrienne Andrechet
Ms. Leilane V. Jan

In-Kind Contributions

3M UNITEK
Jonathan Blansett
Cayman Chemical
Great Lakes Orthodontics, Ltd.
Nobel Biocare
Ormco
Straumann

Gifts in Memory of:

Mr. Carroll A. Bennett, Jr.
Mr. George W. Bramblett, Jr.
Ms. Kimberly Campbell
Mr. Loyd Hagins
Dr. Joe Ledford
Mr. Charles Lewis
Miss Annick Morris
Dr. Sterling R. Schow

Gifts in Honor of:

Ms. Kaye Dugoni

Baylor Oral Health Foundation Contributors


The mission of the Baylor Oral Health Foundation is to provide the College of Dentistry with funds and support to sustain its institutional pre-eminence through excellence in students, faculty, research and outreach.

BOHF does this by managing and raising private dollars for world-class faculty, leading-edge research, academic programs and scholarships.

Private support helps the college go beyond the limits of state and federal funding to provide innovative and high quality programs for thousands of students and patients touched by the college.

The fiscal-year 2017-2018 foundation directors were:

Mr. Neal W. Adams
Mr. Stanley E. Allred
Mr. W. Mike Baggett
Dr. Patricia Blanton
Dr. James S. Cole
Dr. Frank K. Eggleston
Dr. John S. Findley
Dr. Kathy Hamilton
Mr. Larry J. Haynes
Ms. Michelle S. Hickox
Mr. Terry Kelley
Dr. T. Douglas Lawson
Mr. Matthew D. Peiffer
Mr. Carl B. Schieffer
Mr. John D. Solana
Dr. W. Scott Waugh

The following gifts reflect Giving to the foundation in calendar years 2016 and 2017. They were donated to benefit one of these endowments and funds held at BOHF:

Endowments

The Peter H. Buschang

Professorship

Kimberly Campbell Endowed Fund
The Richard F. Ceen Endowment
The James S. Cole Professorship
Robert E. Gaylord Endowed Chair
Tom Matthews Endowed Lectureship
Orts Endowed Scholarship
Periodontic Resident Endowment Fund
The Terry Rees Fellowship in Stomatology/Periodontics
Betty Scott Scholarship
The N. Sue Seale Professorship in Pediatric Dentistry

Funds

Texas A&M College of Dentistry New Building Fund
Alumni Association Fund
William H. Binnie Oral Pathology Fund
Jesse T. Bullard Lectureship Community Clinic Outreach Fund
Gaylord Chair Support Fund
Graduate Endodontics Fund
Graduate Prosthodontics Fund
Tom Matthews Lectureship Fund
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Fund
Orofacial Pain & Sleep Clinic Fund
Ortho Support Fund
Pediatric Dentistry Support Fund
Perio Alumni Fund
Periodontics Scholarship Fund
Robert Staffanou Scholarship Fund
Patricia Clendenin Wessendorff Caruth School Fund

2017

$100,000 or more

Anonymous
Anonymous
Osteogenics Biomedical
Dr. W. Keith Thornton

$25,000—$99,999

Dr. Phillip M. Campbell
Mrs. Mary Daniel / Dr. Fred Voorhees and Mrs. Beth Voorhees
Drs. Bill Gerlach & Lynne Gerlach
Dr. Terry Rees
Mrs. Judy Schow
Straumann USA
Dr. Ronald S. Stukalin and Dr. Janet Stukalin
Dr. Robert G. Triplett

$10,000—$24,999

Dr. Monte Collins
Dr. Ralph J. Jackson
Dr. Fanasy P. Jefcoat
Dr. James Dean Jensen
KLS Martin
Dr. Charles F. Orth
Dr. Ed Owens
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew M. Rees
Dr. Kathy Hamilton Sleeper
Southwest Society of Pediatric Dentistry
Dr. Marvin G. Stephens, Jr.
Dr. John Valant

$5,000—$9,999

Dr. Jay Arnette
Dr. Arun Bala
Dr. Elisabeth Barnhart
Dr. Jacob Bleyer
Brasseler USA
Dr. Frederick Church
Dr. Jonathan Havener
Dr. Cindy Hsu
Dr. Scott Myser
Dr. Shelby Nelson
OHSU Orthodontic Alumni Association
Dr. Brian Pitfield
Dr. Jennifer Ryan
Dr. Katherine Skillestad
Dr. Donald J. Steinberg
Dr. Beth M. Tomlin
Dr. Danny D. Watts

$1,000—$4,999

Dr. Edward P. Allen
Mr. Stan Allred
Dr. Robert Augsburger
Dr. Jay W.S. Baxley
Dr. Charles W. Berry
Bio Horizons
Dr. Ronald Bryant
Dr. Lisa Cheng
Dr. Lauren Companioni
Dr. Brad Crump
Dr. John Tunnell
Dr. Melissa Tricamo Dean
Dr. Neil Dean
Dallas Dental Hygiene Society, Inc.
Dental Auxiliary Service, Inc.
Dr. Garth Griffiths
Dr. David Grogan
Dr. Lisa Harpenau
M & Mrs. Rob Hickox
Dr. Lewis G. Humphreys
Ivoclar Vivident
Dr. Bennett Jacoby
Mrs. Glenna Johns, RDH
Dr. Carolyn A. Kerins
Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Lamberth
Dr. Koyu W. Lin
Ms. Lynne Lipsitz
Dr. D. Brock Lynn
Dr. Robert L. Machen
Dr. Danette McNew-Hovenden
Dr. Michael P. Najera
Nobel Biocare USA
Dr. Harrison Parks
Dr. Nancy Rajchel
Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Roach
Dr. Tinou Roncone
Dr. Jeffrey A. Rossmann
Dr. Tom M. Smith
Dr. Michael Sparks
Dr. Brian Summers
Texas Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
Texas Association of Orthodontists
Dr. Terri Train
Dr. Denise Turunen
Whip Mix Corporation
Dr. Mike Williamson
Dr. Craig Wilson
Dr. Lawrence E. Wolinsky & Dr. Amerian Sones
Dr. Danielle Zambon
Zest Anchors
Zimmer Biomet Dental

$500—$999

Dr. R.G. Wick Alexander
American Academy of Pediatric
Dentistry
Dr. Larry Bellinger
Dr. Jimmy C. Boley
Dr. Neil Bryson
Dr. Ryan Carmichael
Crest Oral B
Mr. Donald J. DeNucci
Dr. Donald D. Depew
Mrs. Barbara Downey
Dr. Gayle Glenn
Dr. Paul C. Gossett
Dr. Kenneth Hamlett
Mr. & Mrs. Larry Haynes
Dr. Jeff Hollister
Dr. Reena Kuba
Dr. Adam Martin
Dr. Susan McGuire
Dr. Alton G. McWhorter
The Murrell Foundation
Dr. J. Michael Nelson
Dr. Fred Olden
Dr. Roy D. Rinkle
Dr. Peter M. Sinclair
Mrs. Patricia Wessendorff

$250—$499

Mr. Neal Adams
Dr. Terry Adams
Dr. Raymond Barbre
Dr. Amy Bender
Dr. Ralph A. Brock, II
Dr. Cooper Callaway
Dr. David Ciesla
Dr & Mrs. James S. Cole
Communities Foundation of Texas
Dr. Carly Cunningham
Dr. Bryan Elvebak
Dr. Jerry Feng
Dr. John A. Gerling
Dr. & Mrs. Hilton Goldreich
Dr. Ralph D. Jackson, Jr.
Dr. Jeffrey James
Dr. Collin Kraus
Dr. Casey R. Lepley
Dr. Ben Martin
Dr. C. C. Massey
Ms. Pat Matulis
Dr. Bart Miller
Dr. Maryam Mojdehi
Dr. Jacqueline Moroco
Dr. Karen Neat
Dr. Michael Pickard
Dr. Ross J. Pulver
Dr. Bruce Reeder
Dr. Sherri Reuland
Dr. Emet Schneiderman
Dr. Kevin L. Seidler
Dr. Stephen P. Shepard
Dr. Adam C. Spencer
Dr. Clayton Spencer
Dr. Thomas M. Stark
Dr. Kathia Steel
Dr. Julie H. Stelly
Dr. Cory Stephens
Dr. Kimberly Travers
Mrs. Lanelle Watkins

$200—$249

Dr. Martha H. Alvarez
Mr. Ray Covington
Mrs. Mildred Dlabaj
Dr. Xiang Li

$100—$199

Anonymous
Mr. Robert J. Bigham, Jr.
Ms. Carolyn Cox
Dr. Robert S. Croft
Dr. Jacob Geller
Mrs. Peggy Harris Hyde
Mr. Harry M. Jannette
Dr. Christopher Luevano
Dr. Barbara Miller
Dr. Lynne A. Opperman
Ms. Gail Parrigin-Clark
Dr. & Mrs. Michael Scott
Ms. Carla Siegesmund
Dr. Michael Silva
Dr. Audrey Stansbury
Dr. Scott Waugh
Dr. Scott B. Williams

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 29

Giving

In-Kind Contributions


A-dec, Inc
American Orthodontics
Dr. Byron Benson
Nobel Biocare
Ortho Organizers
Straumann USA, LLC

Gifts in Memory of:

Dr. Stanley Ashworth
Dr. R.G. "Guinn" Daniel
Mrs. Clara Hoffman
Dr. Kevin Lee
Dr. David Lynn
Dr. Roland Lynn
Dr. M. Dee Ogden

Gifts in Honor of:

Dr. Nancy W. Burkhart
Dr. Paul C. Dechow
Dr. Francisco “Paco” Rivera
Dr. Terry Rees
Dr. Mohsen Taleghani

2016

$1,000,000 or more

Baylor Oral Health Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Ronald Winder

$100,000—$999,999
Nobel Biocare

$10,000—$99,999

KLS Martin
Dr. Phuong Nguyen and Mr. Cameron Tom

$5,000—$9,999

Dr. Linda Niessen
North Texas Endodontics Northwestern Mutual

$1,000—$4,999

American Dental Partners
Foundation Orapharma
SSC - Crothall Healthcare
North Texas Hispanic Dental Association
Delta Dental Insurance Company
Southwestern Society of Orthodontists
Ruth Riley Swords Scholarship
GlaxoSmithKline
Quality Aspirators
American Dental Education Association

$500—$999

Alpha Omega Dental Fraternity
Colgate Speakers Bureau
Hispanic Student Dental Association
J. Anthony Kososki DDS
Dr. Helena Tapias

$250—$499

Ms. Frankie Lou Hansen
Ms. Betty N. Ferraro
Dr. Christie S. Lee
Dr. Paul Edward Menton
Student National Dental Association
Fluellen Family Dentistry
Dr. Sterling Schow

Up to $249

Mrs. Mary Ellen Laursen
Mrs. John Shaw Curry
Ms. Pamela Wade
Dr. Frank Moore
Ms. Carolyn Bower
Dr. Mark Denny
Ms. Joyce Gill
Dr. Thomas Jeter
Dr. Clay Pickering
Dr. Keith J. Stewart
Dr. Anh T. Tran
Huey & Leeanna Bartlett
Psi Omega
Ms. Rebecca Complin
Ms. Judy Martinez Helbing
Dr. Luis R. Campana
Ms. Maureen Calhoon
Ms. Diane Christopher
Ms. Lana Crawford
Ms. Suzanne R. Davis
Robert J. & Linda M. Dollenger
Ms. Sharon Jones
Ms. Adrienne Andrechet
Ms. Leilane V. Jan

In-Kind Contributions

3M UNITEK
Jonathan Blansett
Cayman Chemical
Great Lakes Orthodontics, Ltd.
Nobel Biocare
Ormco
Straumann

Gifts in Memory of:

Mr. Carroll A. Bennett, Jr.
Mr. George W. Bramblett, Jr.
Ms. Kimberly Campbell
Mr. Loyd Hagins
Dr. Joe Ledford
Mr. Charles Lewis
Miss Annick Morris
Dr. Sterling R. Schow

Gifts in Honor of:


Ms. Kaye Dugoni

Baylor Oral Health Foundation Contributors

The mission of the Baylor Oral Health Foundation is to provide the College of Dentistry with funds and support to sustain its institutional pre-eminence through excellence in students, faculty, research and outreach.

BOHF does this by managing and raising private dollars for world-class faculty, leading-edge research, academic programs and scholarships.

Private support helps the college go beyond the limits of state and federal funding to provide innovative and high quality programs for thousands of students and patients touched by the college.

The fiscal-year 2017-2018 foundation directors were:

Mr. Neal W. Adams
Mr. Stanley E. Allred
Mr. W. Mike Baggett
Dr. Patricia Blanton
Dr. James S. Cole
Dr. Frank K. Eggleston
Dr. John S. Findley
Dr. Kathy Hamilton
Mr. Larry J. Haynes
Ms. Michelle S. Hickox
Mr. Terry Kelley
Dr. T. Douglas Lawson
Mr. Matthew D. Peiffer
Mr. Carl B. Schieffer
Mr. John D. Solana
Dr. W. Scott Waugh

The following gifts reflect Giving to the foundation in calendar years 2016 and 2017. They were donated to benefit one of these endowments and funds held at BOHF:

Endowments

The Peter H. Buschang

Professorship

Kimberly Campbell Endowed Fund
The Richard F. Ceen Endowment
The James S. Cole Professorship
Robert E. Gaylord Endowed Chair
Tom Matthews Endowed Lectureship
Orts Endowed Scholarship
Periodontic Resident Endowment Fund
The Terry Rees Fellowship in Stomatology/Periodontics
Betty Scott Scholarship
The N. Sue Seale Professorship in Pediatric Dentistry

Funds

Texas A&M College of Dentistry New Building Fund
Alumni Association Fund
William H. Binnie Oral Pathology Fund
Jesse T. Bullard Lectureship Community Clinic Outreach Fund
Gaylord Chair Support Fund
Graduate Endodontics Fund
Graduate Prosthodontics Fund
Tom Matthews Lectureship Fund
Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Fund
Orofacial Pain & Sleep Clinic Fund
Ortho Support Fund
Pediatric Dentistry Support Fund
Perio Alumni Fund
Periodontics Scholarship Fund
Robert Staffanou Scholarship Fund
Patricia Clendenin Wessendorff Caruth School Fund

2017

$100,000 or more

Anonymous
Anonymous
Osteogenics Biomedical
Dr. W. Keith Thornton

$25,000—$99,999

Dr. Phillip M. Campbell
Mrs. Mary Daniel / Dr. Fred Voorhees and Mrs. Beth Voorhees
Drs. Bill Gerlach & Lynne Gerlach
Dr. Terry Rees
Mrs. Judy Schow
Straumann USA
Dr. Ronald S. Stukalin and Dr. Janet Stukalin
Dr. Robert G. Triplett

$10,000—$24,999

Dr. Monte Collins
Dr. Ralph J. Jackson
Dr. Fanasy P. Jefcoat
Dr. James Dean Jensen
KLS Martin
Dr. Charles F. Orth
Dr. Ed Owens
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew M. Rees
Dr. Kathy Hamilton Sleeper
Southwest Society of Pediatric Dentistry
Dr. Marvin G. Stephens, Jr.
Dr. John Valant

$5,000—$9,999

Dr. Jay Arnette
Dr. Arun Bala
Dr. Elisabeth Barnhart
Dr. Jacob Bleyer
Brasseler USA
Dr. Frederick Church
Dr. Jonathan Havener
Dr. Cindy Hsu
Dr. Scott Myser
Dr. Shelby Nelson
OHSU Orthodontic Alumni Association
Dr. Brian Pitfield
Dr. Jennifer Ryan
Dr. Katherine Skillestad
Dr. Donald J. Steinberg
Dr. Beth M. Tomlin
Dr. Danny D. Watts

$1,000—$4,999

Dr. Edward P. Allen
Mr. Stan Allred
Dr. Robert Augsburger
Dr. Jay W.S. Baxley
Dr. Charles W. Berry
Bio Horizons
Dr. Ronald Bryant
Dr. Lisa Cheng
Dr. Lauren Companioni
Dr. Brad Crump
Dr. John Tunnell
Dr. Melissa Tricamo Dean
Dr. Neil Dean
Dallas Dental Hygiene Society, Inc.
Dental Auxiliary Service, Inc.
Dr. Garth Griffiths
Dr. David Grogan
Dr. Lisa Harpenau
M & Mrs. Rob Hickox
Dr. Lewis G. Humphreys
Ivoclar Vivident
Dr. Bennett Jacoby
Mrs. Glenna Johns, RDH
Dr. Carolyn A. Kerins
Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Lamberth
Dr. Koyu W. Lin
Ms. Lynne Lipsitz
Dr. D. Brock Lynn
Dr. Robert L. Machen
Dr. Danette McNew-Hovenden
Dr. Michael P. Najera
Nobel Biocare USA
Dr. Harrison Parks
Dr. Nancy Rajchel
Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Roach
Dr. Tinou Roncone
Dr. Jeffrey A. Rossmann
Dr. Tom M. Smith
Dr. Michael Sparks
Dr. Brian Summers
Texas Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
Texas Association of Orthodontists
Dr. Terri Train
Dr. Denise Turunen
Whip Mix Corporation
Dr. Mike Williamson
Dr. Craig Wilson
Dr. Lawrence E. Wolinsky & Dr. Amerian Sones
Dr. Danielle Zambon
Zest Anchors
Zimmer Biomet Dental

$500—$999

Dr. R.G. Wick Alexander
American Academy of Pediatric
Dentistry
Dr. Larry Bellinger
Dr. Jimmy C. Boley
Dr. Neil Bryson
Dr. Ryan Carmichael
Crest Oral B
Mr. Donald J. DeNucci
Dr. Donald D. Depew
Mrs. Barbara Downey
Dr. Gayle Glenn
Dr. Paul C. Gossett
Dr. Kenneth Hamlett
Mr. & Mrs. Larry Haynes
Dr. Jeff Hollister
Dr. Reena Kuba
Dr. Adam Martin
Dr. Susan McGuire
Dr. Alton G. McWhorter
The Murrell Foundation
Dr. J. Michael Nelson
Dr. Fred Olden
Dr. Roy D. Rinkle
Dr. Peter M. Sinclair
Mrs. Patricia Wessendorff

$250—$499

Mr. Neal Adams
Dr. Terry Adams
Dr. Raymond Barbre
Dr. Amy Bender
Dr. Ralph A. Brock, II
Dr. Cooper Callaway
Dr. David Ciesla
Dr & Mrs. James S. Cole
Communities Foundation of Texas
Dr. Carly Cunningham
Dr. Bryan Elvebak
Dr. Jerry Feng
Dr. John A. Gerling
Dr. & Mrs. Hilton Goldreich
Dr. Ralph D. Jackson, Jr.
Dr. Jeffrey James
Dr. Collin Kraus
Dr. Casey R. Lepley
Dr. Ben Martin
Dr. C. C. Massey
Ms. Pat Matulis
Dr. Bart Miller
Dr. Maryam Mojdehi
Dr. Jacqueline Moroco
Dr. Karen Neat
Dr. Michael Pickard
Dr. Ross J. Pulver
Dr. Bruce Reeder
Dr. Sherri Reuland
Dr. Emet Schneiderman
Dr. Kevin L. Seidler
Dr. Stephen P. Shepard
Dr. Adam C. Spencer
Dr. Clayton Spencer
Dr. Thomas M. Stark
Dr. Kathia Steel
Dr. Julie H. Stelly
Dr. Cory Stephens
Dr. Kimberly Travers
Mrs. Lanelle Watkins

$200—$249

Dr. Martha H. Alvarez
Mr. Ray Covington
Mrs. Mildred Dlabaj
Dr. Xiang Li

$100—$199

Anonymous
Mr. Robert J. Bigham, Jr.
Ms. Carolyn Cox
Dr. Robert S. Croft
Dr. Jacob Geller
Mrs. Peggy Harris Hyde
Mr. Harry M. Jannette
Dr. Christopher Luevano
Dr. Barbara Miller
Dr. Lynne A. Opperman
Ms. Gail Parrigin-Clark
Dr. & Mrs. Michael Scott
Ms. Carla Siegesmund
Dr. Michael Silva
Dr. Audrey Stansbury
Dr. Scott Waugh
Dr. Scott B. Williams

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 30

Giving


Up to $99

Dr. Armin Aliefendic
Dr. Courtney Bohn
Dr. Burt Bryan
Dr. Collin Burns
Ms. Jane Cotter
Ms. Judy Crum

Dr. Jennifer Deck
Ms. Kay Egbert
Dr. Sean Gunnels
Mrs. Joni Hopps, RDH
Mrs. Terri Kennedy Jones, RDH
Dr. Harold J. Koppel
Ms. Karen O. Lanier, RDH
Dr. Martha Malik
Mrs. Rebecca Hooker Ogle, RDH
Ms. Carolyn W. Phillips, RDH
Mrs. Frieda Pickett, RDH
Ms. Linda Piper
Dr. Brian Platt
Mrs. Dianna Prachyl, RDH
Mrs. Lisa Raburn
Mrs. Kay Ricketts, RDH
Mrs. Deborah L. Rowland, RDH
Dr. Michelle Simmons
Mr. Marvin Vance
Ms. Brigitte Wallaert Sims
Ms. Londa Wilder
Ms. Susan Williams, RDH

2016

$25,000 or more

Drs. Alan & Cynthia Reed Straumann
Dr. W. Keith Thornton
Dr. Robert G. Triplett

$10,000—$24,999

KLS Martin, LP

$5,000—$9,999

Brasseler USA
Paul P. Taylor Association of Pediatric Dentists

$1,000—$4,999

American Orthodontics
Dr. Bradley T. Beckel
Dr. Charles W. Berry
Dr. & Mrs. J.C. Boley
Dr. Ralph A. Brock, II
Dr. & Mrs. Peter Buschang
Cain, Watters & Associates
Dr. Phillip M. Campbell
Cogent Designs / Tops Software
DenMat
Dentsply
GAC International
Dentsply IH, Inc.
Dr. Bryan Elvebak
Cindy & John Gay
Geistlich Pharma North America, Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. Rob Hickox
Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Issacson
Ivoclar
Vivadent
Dr. & Mrs. R. D. Jackson, Jr.
Dr. & Mrs. Ralph K. Jenke
Dr. & Mrs. Robert E. Lamberth
Dr. Maryam Mojdehi-Barnes
Dr. Marshall Morgan
Nobel Biocare
Ortho Organizers
Osteogenics Biomedical
Drs. Priscilla & Stan Parker
P & G Company
Piezosurgery
Dr. Donald H. Roberts
Texas Academy of Pediatric Dentistry
Texas Association of Orthodontists
3M Unitek
Dr. Terri Train
Dr. John R. Valant
Whip Mix Corporation
Dr. Lawrence E. Wolinsky & Dr. Amerian Sones
Mr. & Mrs. Steve Zachariah Zest Anchors
Zimmer Biomet Dental

$500—$999

Dr. Terry B. Adams
American College of Dentists
Dr. & Mrs. Jay Arnette
Dr. L. James Bell
Dr. & Mrs. Larry Bellinger
Dr. Roberto Carrillo
Dr. & Mrs. James S. Cole
Crest-Oral B
Dr. Stephanie Crise
Mrs. Barbara Downey
Dr. & Mrs. Arthur A. Dugoni
Dr. Gayle Glenn
Mr. & Mrs. Larry Haynes Implant & Periodontal Dentistry
Dr. Regina Jensen
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth C. Killen
Mr. & Mrs. Gary MacDowell
Mrs. Juanna Moore & Mr. Ricardo Vasquez
Dr. Jacqueline Moroco
Dr. Scott Myser
Dr. Shelby Nelson
Dr. Tom Phelan
Dr. & Mrs. Jerry Roach
Dr. Richard Roblee
Smiles By German Design
TAMCOD Orthodontic Alumni Association
Dr. Kim Travers
Mrs. Patricia C. Wessendorff, RDH

$250—$499

Mr. Neal Adams
Dr. Joseph C. Ainsworth, III
Dr. J. Moody Alexander
Edward H. Angle Society of Orthodontists
Austin Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Associates
Dr. Raymond Barbre
Ms. Diana Barnes
Dr. Adam Benham
Dr. Bridget R. Burris
Dr. Linda L. Cheng
Dr. Lisa Cheng
Dr. Monte Collins
Dr. Carly Cunningham
Dr. D. Douglas Depew
Dr. Robert Gallagher
Dr. Mark S. Geller
Dr. Jeff Genecov
Dr. Hilton Goldreich
Dr. Andrew Hodges
Dr. & Mrs. Dean Hudson
Dr. Jeff Johnson
Dr. Seuss Kassisieh
Dr. Mark LaHaye
Dr. Jeremy Lustig
Dr. Casey R. Lepley
Dr. Rodney P. Lewis
Dr. C. C. Massey
Dr. Sandra McCarthy
Dr. Bart Miller
Dr. Loulou Moore
Moss Luse & Womble, LLC
Dr. Karen Neat
Dr. Samuel G. Papandreas
Dr. Dan C. Peavy
Dr. Michael Pickard
Dr. Michael D. Plunk
Dr. Bruce Reeder
Dr. Matthew S. Roberts
Dr. Wayne Sankey
Dr. Kirk D. Satrom
Mr. Carl Schieffer
Dr. Stephen P. Shepard
Dr. John Sherrard
Dr. Clayton G. Spencer
Dr. Fred L. Spradley
Dr. Thomas M. Stark
Dr. Eric Vela
Dr. Elaine Whitney

$100—$249

Anonymous
Dr. Douglas M. Anderson
Dr. & Mrs. Eugene Barrett
Dr. Mac L. Bennett, III
Mr. Robert J. Bigham, Jr.
Mr. Bryan Blair
Dr. & Mrs. Mark Bennett & Kim
and Tracy
Dr. & Mrs. Philip B. Caldwell
Dr. & Mrs. Richard F. Ceen
Dr. & Mrs. John D. Chandler
Dr. Yi-Sheng Cheng
Dr. Jun Y. Cho
Dr. Brad A. Chvatal
Dr. & Mrs. Hank L. Conaway
Mr. Ray Covington
Ms. Carolyn Cox
Dr. Robert Croft
Dr. Alan A. Curtis
Dr. Mark L. Dake
Dr. Jessica Downs
Dr. Yiyu Fang
Dr. Jerry Feng
Mrs. Betty Ferraro
Mr. & Mrs. Ron Gallerano
Dr. Jacob Geller
Dr. John A. Gerling
Ms. Shirley F. Grubbs & Helen G. Watts
Mrs. Betty Hagins
Mr. & Mrs. Mack L. Hampton
Dr. Steve K. Harrel
Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. Harris
Ms. Peggy Harris Hyden
Dr. Barry James
Dr. Jeffrey James
Dr. Katie Julien
Dr. & Mrs. Steve Karbowski
Dr. Stephen A. Kellam
Ms. Jennifer Kennedy
Dr. Cole Kerns
Dr. David Kerns
Dr. Harvey Kessler
Dr. Harold J. Koppel
Dr. Collin D. Kraus
Mrs. Mary A. Laursen, RDH
Dr. Steven Lindauer
Dr. Adam Martin
Ms. Pat Matulis
Dr. Matthew D. McBride
Dr. Danette McNew
Mr. & Mrs. Gene Meyers
Ms. Nancy Minter
Mrs. Elizabeth Mngomezulu, RDH
Dr. W. Jim Moore, Jr.
Dr. & Mrs. Willis H. Murphey, Jr.
Not Just For Newcomers Ladies Bridge Group
Mr. & Mrs. Danny Oberst
Dr. Seong Park
Ms. Gail Parrigin-Clark
Ms. Linda Piper
Dr. Cameron Ponsford
Dr. Mitchell Ponsford
Dr. Ross J. Pulver
Mr. & Mrs. Steve Richards
Dr. Lee M. Romine
Dr. & Mrs. Gerald A. Schneider
Dr. Emet Schneiderman
Dr. Sang Ho Shin
Dr. Bhavna Shroff
Ms. Carla Siegesmund
Dr. George Y. Soh
Dr. Young Song
Dr. Adam C. Spencer
Dr. Tom M. Stark
Dr. Matthew Steffer
Dr. Kathy Svoboda
TAMCOD Orthodontics Staff
Dr. Stephen Walker
Mrs. Lanelle Watkins
Dr. Evan G. Wilson
Dr. John M. Wright
Up to $99
Dr. Paco Aguilera
Mrs. Nancy Anthony
Ms. Nati Aramayo, RDH
Dr. Ben Archer
Dr. Monica Aron
Dr. James B. Barnes
Mrs. Mary Bennett and family
Mr. & Mrs. Truett Bennett
Ms. Elain Benton
Mr. & Mrs. Larry Bethke
Dr. Burt Bryan
Dr. Ryan Carmichael
Dr. Lauren Carney
Dr. & Mrs. Blaine S. Clements
Ms. Lori Dees
Mr. & Mrs. Bill Dix
Ms. Kay Egbert
Ms. Jennifer Fuentes
Dr. & Mrs. Mark E. Gannaway
Dr. & Mrs. Gerald A. Glickman
Dr. & Mrs. Todd Gorden
Dr. Carmen V. Graves
Ms. Chelsea Hill, RDH
Mr. & Mrs. R.D. Hopper
Ms. Glenna Johns
Ms. Cherri L. Kading, RDH
Dr. Rishika Kapoor
Dr. Naveen Karim
Dr. Gene Lamberth
Ms. Karen Lanier, RDH
Ms. Phong My Lieu, RDH Livingston High School Class of ’58
Ms. Susan McAlister
Dr. & Mrs. Christopher McCarty
Dr. Carl Mentesana
Ms. Colleen M. Provasek
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Pursley
Ms. Rosanna Ratliff
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas G. Reddy
Dr. & Mrs. George A. Richards
Dr. Jordan Richert
Mrs. Kay Fincher Rickets
Dr. Jeffrey Rossmann
Mrs. Constance Slocomb & the late John G. Slocomb
Ms. Ann Smith
Dr. & Mrs. Robert Spears
Dr. & Mrs. Reginald W. Taylor
Town North Woman's Club
Dr. John Tunnel
Dr. Sean Vreeburg
Mrs. Brigitte Wallaert Sims
Mrs. Eleanor Weigand
Mr. & Mrs. Eric Weiss
Dr. Tyler Wildey
Mr. & Mrs. Bob Wolfenbarger
Ms. Leigh Ann Wyatt

Alumni Association Contributors


Each alumnus of the college is encouraged to contribute to the Alumni Association Fund, which is managed by the Baylor Oral Health Foundation. These donations fund scholarships, programs, networking/career opportunities and awards to benefit current and future alumni. The following gifts are reported by calendar year.

2017

Dean’s Club - $1,000 or more

Dr. Bradley Beckel ’98
Dr. Neil A. Bryson ’75
Dr. Thomas Brad Crump ’97
Dallas Dental Hygienists’ Society
Dr. John A. Daniel ’87
Dental Auxiliary Service, Inc.
Dr. Gwendolyn Dawn Kines ’05
Dr. Kay Lee ’02
Dr. Greg LoPour ’95
Dr. Danette C. McNew ’88
Dr. Minh-Khoi Nguyen ’06
Dr. Phuong N. Nguyen ’01
Dr. Julie H. Stelly ’87

Scholar’s Club - $500—$999

Dr. Chad J. Capps ’08
Dr. Omel G. Cardenas ’00
Dr. Mark A. Craig ’90
Crest Oral B
Dr. Sean E. Fitzgerald ’09
Dr. Stephen J. Griffin ’85
Dr. Kenneth M. Hamlett, Jr. ’74
Dr. Tommy Harrison ’79
Dr. David K. Hunter ’89
Dr. Marshall V. Johnson ’87
Dr. Demetra C. Dorsey Jones ’98
Dr. Ernestine S. Lacy ’04
Dr. Eduardo R. Lorenzana ’96
Dr. Maryam Mojdehi ’97
Dr. Sancerie J. O’Rourke-Allen ’98
Dr. LaVan R. Parker, III ’94
Dr. Anandkumar N. Patel ’97
Dr. Zachary S. Schwab ’03
Dr. Scott M. Staffel ’95
Ms. Elizabeth D. Voorhees ’80
Dr. Fred J. Voorhees ’77
Dr. Karen E. Williamson ’90
McCarthy’s Club - $250—$499
Dr. Dean L.G. Carlston ’72
Dr. Chris S. Cartwright ’78
Dr. Penelope S. Drayer ’09
Dr. Bryan Elvebak ’01
Ms. Betty N. Ferraro ’68
Dr. Randall L. Griffith ’77
Dr. Brian L. Hochstein ’92
Dr. Lester H. Kuperman ’70
Dr. William T. Lee, Jr. ’67
Dr. Paul E. Menton ’66
Dr. Jill E. Michaels ’88
Dr. Rajeev Misra ’94
Dr. Laura L. Mitchell ’06
Dr. Frank H. Moore, Jr. ’69
Dr. Jesse Murillo ’98
Dr. Rita F. Ne ’96
Dr. Gayle A. Owens ’71
Dr. Daniel C. Peavy, Jr. ’62
Dr. William R. Phillips, III ’97
Dr. Michael Pickard ’06
Dr. David W. Price ’81
Dr. Everett Renger, Jr. ’70
Dr. Donald H. Roberts, Jr. ’74
Dr. George F. Schudy ’70
Dr. Ty Shafer ’03
Dr. Joe J. Simmons, III ’98
Dr. Johnny C. Smith ’81
Ms. Janice L. Snyder ’75
Dr. Marlene L. Spady ’88
Dr. Brian R. Summers ’87
Dr. David I. Tindle ’88
Dr. Thomas M. Weil ’65
Dr. James E. Williams ’83
Dr. Andy Wilson ’95
Dr. Ronald L. Winder ’73
Century Club - $150—$249
Ms. Tiffany Bergstrom ’14
Dr. Dan F. Bida ’75
Ms. Shelley Bixler ’12
Dr. Richard W. Boyd, Jr. ’76
Dr. David N. Brown ’76

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 31

Dr. Burt C. Bryan ’79
Dr. Bridget R. Burris ’85
Dr. Thomas D. Calabria ’84
Dr. Courtney Carr ’08
Dr. Yong G. Cheong ’61
Dr. Leon A. Conkling ’72
Dr. A. Sam Coury ’61
Dr. Carly Cunningham ’04
Dr. Russell Cunningham ’02
Dr. Jeffrey S. Davis ’79
Dr. Paul G. Davis Jr. ’83
Dr. Michael L. Dobbins ’68
Dr. Mark A. Dougherty ’87
Ms. Betty Durland ’65
Dr. Jason Lee Espinoza ’14
Dr. Joseph Dylan Everett ’15
Dr. George F. Forney Jr. ’59
Dr. Allison Fowler ’13
Dr. Debra C. Frankfurt ’80
Dr. Devek K. Frech ’86
Dr. Jacob Geller ’56
Dr. William H. Gerlach ’87
Dr. Danielle R. Geshay ’13
Dr. Mary B. Ginderske-Criswell ’67
Dr. James B. Goates ’76
Dr. Kimberly Gronberg ’02
Mrs. Frankie L. Hansen ’68
Dr. James B. Herrington ’86
Dr. Adam Hodges ’04
Dr. Nathan E. Hodges ’00
Dr. Kirk C. Hooper ’84
Dr. Kevin V. Hua ’12
Dr. Michael J. Hudgins ’81
Dr. Quyen Tu Huynh ’09
Dr. Joseph E. Irving ’81
Mrs. Glenna J. Johns ’65
Dr. Richard L. Johnson ’68
Dr. Ben H. Jones ’64
Dr. Esther C. Lee Joystone ’67
Dr. Steve Karbowski
Dr. John M. Kidwell ’76
Dr. Jonathan R. Kimes ’07
Dr. Karen A. Knight ’88
Dr. Wesley A. Lasater ’70
Dr. Celeste E. Latham ’97
Dr. Christine Le ’11
Dr. John D. LeBlanc ’74
Dr. Peter V. Lecca ’90
Dr. John E. Leonard ’56
Dr. James M. Lloyd ’81
Dr. Scott A. Logan ’84
Dr. David Brockway Lynn, Jr. ’80
Dr. D. Michael Mabry ’75
Dr. Gelynn L. Majure ’91
Dr. Matthew David McBride ’12
Dr. Byron M. McKnight ’81
Dr. Ted A. Methvin ’98
Dr. Amp W. Miller, III ’73
Dr. Charles W. Miller ’80
Dr. Frank R. Miller ’61
Dr. J. Christian Miller ’84
Dr. Loren M. Miller ’84
Dr. V. Terry Miller ’85
Dr. Davis W. Morgan ’89
Dr. David H. Morris ’68
Dr. Partha Mukherji ’01
Dr. Scott Anthony Myser ’08
Dr. Cal Nunnally ’01
Dr. Melinda A. Parker ’89
Dr. William Tom Parker ’72
Dr. James L. Pavelka ’72
Dr. Robert J. Pavelka ’98
Dr. Gary W. Penn ’78
Dr. Todd Phelan ’04
Ms. Anna L. Phillips ’95
Dr. Kevin E. Porter ’92
Dr. Harlan L. Raley ’51
Dr. Hal H. Ramsey ’61
Ms. Cassie L. Epperson Randers ’03
Dr. Thomas B. Randers, Jr. ’05
Dr. Robert L. Reames, Jr. ’69
Dr. Michael J. Reed ’81
Dr. Terry D. Rees ’68
Dr. James H. Reisman ’76
Mrs. Kay F. Rickets ’58
Dr. Janet B. Ritchey ’77
Dr. Matthew Bryson Roberts ’07
Dr. J. Dean Robertson ’41
Dr. Dena G. Robinson ’99
Dr. Brian Salome ’03
Dr. Andrea M. Scoville ’83
Dr. James A. Snyder ’67
Dr. Joseph A. Snyder ’80
Dr. Chester E. Spencer Jr. ’67
Dr. Dennis E. Stansbury ’74
Dr. Scott A. Stein ’87
Dr. Claude R. Stephens, Jr. ’81
Dr. Larry R. Stewart ’79
Dr. Stevens T. Ta ’99
Dr. Tuan Anh Tran ’98
Dr. David H. Utzinger ’63
Dr. Drew M. Vanderbrook ’12
Dr. Terry D. Watson ’67
Dr. John M. Weaver ’83
Dr. Stephen T. White ’72
Dr. Bettye Whiteaker-Hurt ’68
Dr. Robert C. Witt ’86
Dr. Brian H. Wong ’97
Dr. Karl F. Woodmansey ’89
Dr. Debrah J. Worsham ’85
Dr. James L. Wyatt Jr. ’47
Dr. May Yeap ’00

Supporters - Up to $149

Mrs. Susie Martin Bower ’68
Ms. Sue B. Brown ’73
Dr. Simeon B. Cook ’71
Ms. Jane Cotter
Ms. Lana C. Crawford ’68
Dr. Kristi L. Taylor Davis ’96
Ms. Ann M. Day ’93
Ms. Cynthia L. Fooshee ’79
Dr. Karen Foster ’02
Dr. David B. Gregory ’75
Ms. Pamela K. Hallman ’72
Ms. Kristi Henderson ’89
Ms. Sarah D. Hetzel ’96
Ms. Joni R. Hopps ’79
Mrs. Caroline G. Hyde ’73
Ms. Peggy Hyden ’79
Ms. Laurie Inglis ’02
Mr. Harry M. Jannette
Ms. Terri Kennedy Jones ’65
Dr. Thomas B. King ’51
Ms. Tracy M. King ’95
Ms. Karen A. Lanier ’72
Mrs. Mary Ellen Laursen ’68
Dr. Lisa S. Lin ’95
Ms. Martha Malik ’74
Ms. Joanne Martinez ’03
Dr. Ann McCann
Mrs. Rebecca A. Ogle ’62
Ms. Kathleen O’Neill-Smith ’65
Ms. Joy Parker ’03
Ms. Judy M. Payne ’73
Ms. Carolyn W. Phillips ’68
Ms. Frieda A. Pickett ’66
Ms. Don R. Pitts ’58
Ms. Dianna C. Prachyl ’94
Ms. Bertha J. Reed ’67
Dr. George A. Richards ’63
Dr. J. Frank Roark ’43
Ms. Deborah Rowland ’80
Dr. Audrey Lynn Stansbury ’09
Ms. Katherine L. Stilwell ’96
Ms. Lynn M. Tevis ’96
Dr. James D. Utter
Ms. Gloria B. Van Dusen ’73
Ms. Pamela Wade ’68
Mrs. Mary A. Wallis ’62
Dr. Dennis E. Weibel ’73
Dr. J. Robert Wells ’77
Mrs. Patricia C. Wessendorff
Ms. Dorothy J. Wiley ’70
Ms. Judith K. Williams ’70
Dr. Jeffrey S. Woodson ’67

2016

Dean’s Club - $1,000 or more

Dr. Bradly T. Beckel ’98
Dr. Neil A. Bryson ’75
Dr. Sue Chhay ’98
Dr. Thomas Brad Crump ’97
Dr. Thuydung Do ’10
Dr. Marshall V. Johnson ’87
Dr. Gwendolyn Dawn Kines ’05
Dr. Minh-Khoi Nguyen ’06
Dr. Phuong Nguyen ’01
Dr. Dena G. Robinson ’99

Scholar’s Club - $500—$999

Dr. Monica Boehmer ’89
Dr. Richard W. Boyd, Jr. ’76
Dr. Barrie B. Choate ’84
Dr. Russell Cunningham ’02
Dr. Sean E Fitzgerald ’09
Dr. Randall L. Griffith ’77
Dr. Kenneth M. Hamlett, Jr. ’74
Dr. Tommy Harrison ’79
Dr. Larry D. Herwig ’84
Dr. David K. Hunter ’89
Dr. Demetra C. Dorsey Jones ’98
Dr. H. Lee Kavanagh ’02
Dr. James R. Kersten ’69
Dr. Chris L. Kirby ’89
Dr. Nisha B. Krishnaiah ’97
Dr. Ernestine S. Lacy ’04
Dr. Emily Q. Lee ’02
Dr. Eduardo R. Lorenzana ’96
Dr. Maryam Mojdehi ’97
Dr. LaVan R. Parker, III ’94
Dr. William R. Phillips, III ’97
Dr. David W. Price ’81
Dr. Jerry V. Roach ’71
Dr. Kirk E. Scott ’96
Dr. Kevin L. Seidler ’78
Dr. Julie H. Stelly ’87
Dr. Christopher L. Tye ’88
Dr. Fred J. Voorhees ’77
Dr. Valerie D. Washington ’87
Mrs. Patricia C. Wessendorff

McCarthy’s Club - $250—$499

Dr. Steven J. Austin ’85
Dr. Harold A. Black ’81
Dr. Chad J. Capps ’08
Ms. Lori A. Cernosek ’85
Dr. Carly Cunningham ’04
Dr. Mark A. Dougherty ’87
Ms. Betty N. Ferraro ’68
Dr. Gary L. Gilbert ’74
Dr. C. Robert Henry Jr. ’72
Dr. Brian L. Hochstein ’92
Dr. Nathan E. Hodges ’00
Dr. Robert K. Hunt ’85
Dr. Quyen Tu Huynh ’09
Ms. Laurie Inglis ’02
Dr. Ben H. Jones ’64
Dr. Lester H. Kuperman ’70
Dr. William T. Lee, Jr. ’67
Dr. David Brockway Lynn Jr. ’80
Dr. Scott A. Mason ’93
Dr. Byron M. McKnight ’81
Dr. Danette C. McNew ’88
Dr. Rajeev Misra ’94
Dr. Frank H. Moore Jr. ’69
Dr. James R. Moore ’84
Dr. Partha Mukherji ’01
Dr. Scott Anthony Myser ’08
Dr. Rita F. Ne ’96
Dr. Anne M. Orr ’93
Dr. Gayle A. Owens ’71
Dr. William Tom Parker ’72
Dr. Anandkumar N. Patel ’97
Dr. Daniel C. Peavy Jr. ’62
Ms. Anna L. Phillips ’95
Dr. Michael Pickard ’06
Dr. Judith A. Ragsdale ’86
Dr. Everett Renger, Jr. ’70
Dr. Carina L. Schwartz-Dabney ’93
Dr. Stephanie Jennings Singleton ’00
Dr. Carmen P. Smith ’96
Dr. Johnny C. Smith ’81
Ms. Janice L. Snyder ’75
Dr. Audrey Lynn Stansbury ’09
Dr. Erwin E. Tang ’83
Dr. Eduardo Tanur ’92
Dr. David I. Tindle ’88
Dr. Caryn Vertucci ’99
Dr. Ronald H. Watkins ’68
Ms. Patricia Whalley ’66
Dr. James E. Williams ’83
Dr. Andy Wilson ’95
Dr. Ronald L. Winder ’73
Dr. Joe H. Yarbro ’77

Century Club - $150—$249

Dr. George Acquaye ’96
Dr. John E. Adcock ’75
Dr. Jay C. Adkins ’81
Dr. Zoel G. Allen II ’95
Dr. Dean N. Armstrong ’78
Dr. Ray A. Ashcraft ’63
Dr. John T. Baker ’67
Dr. Kay S. Beavers ’90
Dr. Michael C. Bell ’78
Ms. Tiffany Bergstrom ’14
Dr. Leonard L. Brewster ’59
Dr. Rex E. Brewster ’60
Dr. Carroll D. Brown, Jr. ’77
Dr. Burt C. Bryan ’79
Dr. Marco Caballeros ’14
Dr. William C. Cain ’01
Dr. Patricia A. Calabria ’81
Dr. Omel G. Cardenas ’00
Dr. Dave S. Carpenter ’83
Dr. James R. Carroll, Jr. ’74
Dr. Kyle Chambers ’14
Dr. Thanh Chiem ’14
Dr. Gregory T. Cohlmia ’74
Dr. Ray Cohlmia ’59
Dr. Terry A. Darden ’63
Dr. Jeffrey S. Davis ’79
Dr. Thomas H. Dembinski, II ’74
Dr. Michael Ding ’04
Dr. Arlet R. Dunsworth ’69
Ms. Janell Dunsworth ’71
Dr. John S. Findley ’70
Dr. George F. Forney, Jr. ’59
Dr. Devek K. Frech ’86
Dr. Fereshteh Ganjoor ’07
Dr. W. Jay Garard, Jr. ’77
Dr. Lynne S. Gerlach ’87
Dr. William H. Gerlach ’87
Dr. James B. Getz ’76
Dr. William P. Glaros ’74
Dr. John N. Glennon ’88
Dr. James B. Goates ’76
Dr. Marshal D. Goldberg ’80
Dr. James L. Greenwood, Jr. ’87
Dr. David B. Gregory ’75
Dr. Kimberly Gronberg ’02
Dr. Clayton M. Hamilton ’86
Dr. Andrew Hodges ’04
Dr. David John Hoffman ’09
Dr. Susan Hollar ’80
Dr. Kirk C. Hooper ’84
Dr. Robert V. Hughes ’66
Dr. Joseph E. Irving ’81
Dr. Bobby Jivnani ’03
Mrs. Glenna J. Johns ’65
Dr. Jonathan R. Kimes ’07
Dr. Patricia Kimes ’07
Dr. Craig Knell ’06
Dr. S. Ramsey Koschak ’79
Dr. Celeste E. Latham ’97
Dr. Paul N. Latta ’91
Dr. Christine Le ’11
Dr. Rodney P. Lewis ’98
Dr. Matthew David McBride ’12
Dr. Kelly Hartnett McDermott ’94
Dr. Amp W. Miller, III ’73
Dr. Charles W. Miller ’80
Dr. Loren M. Miller ’84
Dr. V. Terry Miller ’85
Dr. Jack O. Mills ’61
Dr. David H. Morris ’68
Dr. Karen S. Neat ’83
Dr. Jimmy W. Novak ’75
Dr. Cal Nunnally ’01
Dr. Lynette Marie Ogletree ’05
Dr. Sancerie J. O'Rourke-Allen ’98
Dr. Meredith H. Packard ’93
Dr. James L. Pavelka ’72
Dr. Robert J. Pavelka ’98
Dr. Gary W. Penn ’78
Dr. Tom Perry ’74
Dr. Richard E. Phelan ’78
Dr. Todd Phelan ’04
Dr. Alisha B. Porter ’96
Dr. Kevin E. Porter ’92
Dr. Thomas J. Powers, VI ’83
Ms. Dianna C. Prachyl ’94
Dr. Harlan L. Raley ’51
Dr. Hal H. Ramsey ’61
Dr. Murray R. Ray ’68
Dr. Michael J. Reed ’81
Dr. Terry D. Rees ’68
Dr. Jeffrey D. Rhodes ’88
Mrs. Kay F. Rickets ’58
Dr. Matthew Bryson Roberts ’07
Dr. Brian Salome ’03
Dr. Victor A. Sandoval ’75
Dr. Gregory B. Scheideman ’79
Ms. Shari S. Schwartz ’76
Dr. Andrea M. Scoville ’83
Dr. Marlene L. Spady ’88
Dr. Scott A. Stein ’87
Dr. Claude R. Stephens, Jr. ’81
Dr. Lewis H. Stephenson ’86
Dr. Barry Stovall ’75
Dr. Janet E. Stukalin ’88
Dr. Stevens T. Ta ’99
Dr. W. Keith Thornton ’69
Dr. William M. Thorsell, Jr. ’54
Dr. Tuan Anh Tran ’98
Dr. Kimberly H. Travers ’96
Dr. David H. Utzinger ’63
Dr. Drew M. Vanderbrook ’12
Ms. Elizabeth D. Voorhees ’80
Dr. Robert B. Waheed ’85
Dr. Paul D. Wallace ’83
Dr. J. Robert Wells ’77
Dr. John C. White ’84
Dr. Bettye Whiteaker-Hurt ’68
Dr. Steven Widner ’86
Dr. Graham Wilson ’66
Dr. Karl F. Woodmansey ’89
Dr. Debrah J. Worsham ’85
Supporters - Up to $149
Dr. Barton C. Allen ’80
Dr. Nati N. Aramayo ’13
Ms. Martha W. Berry ’72
Mrs. Judith A. Blackwell ’66
Dr. Stephanie Smith Crise ’95
Dr. Jacob Geller ’56
Ms. Chelsea G. Hill ’16
Ms. Peggy Hyden ’79
Ms. Cherri L. Kading
Dr. Thomas B. King ’51
Dr. Karen A. Knight ’88
Ms. Karen A. Lanier ’72
Mrs. Mary Ellen Laursen ’68
Ms. Aimee A. Lehman ’96
Ms. Phuong Lieu ’07
Ms. Elizabeth Mngomezulu ’13
Dr. Kyle C. Nunley ’86
Ms. Don R. Pitts ’58
Dr. J. Frank Roark ’43
Dr. David Singleton, Jr. ’72
Dr. Dan R. White ’61
Ms. Diana D. Williams ’59

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 32

Impressions


The “Impressions” page captures a moment in time in the rich history of our Dallas dental school. The people of Texas A&M College of Dentistry have called the school by various names: State Dental College from 1905 to 1918, Baylor University College of Dentistry from 1918 to 1971 and Baylor College of Dentistry from 1971 to 1996, when the name became longer to reflect the affiliation with the Texas A&M University System and, later, its health science center.

In 2013, a new name reflected an alliance with Texas A&M University. Through the ebb and flow of history, the dental school has been nurtured by people who reaped its benefits and perpetuated its legacy. Enjoy this glimpse into the mirror of time.

Spring/Summer 2018 | Texas A&M Dentistry | 33

Construction Rewind: The Path To New Clinics 70 Years Ago


Excerpts from “Baylor College of Dentistry: the First 100 Years,” “Baylor Dental Journal March 1951” and recent interviews with Dr. Bob Dewberry, Class of 1947

Dr. Bob Dewberry ’47 remembers a disconcerting detail about the clinic building at 1420 Hall St. where he learned dental procedures as a student.

“The floor was so unstable that when someone walked by, both the patient and the student were shaken,” he says. “That made it tough to condense a gold foil, which was very tedious work under those circumstances. Gold foil was an excellent material but very slow and labor intensive.”

The crowded quarters also are etched in Dewberry’s memory: “The student nearby would often ask, ‘May I borrow your excavator?’ or some other instrument. More often than not it was forgotten and never returned. The result was a bit chaotic.” Shortly after Dewberry graduated, construction began on a four-story 45,000-square-foot building a few blocks away at 800 Hall St. The new clinical facility included the departments of oral surgery, operative dentistry, crown and bridge, children’s dentistry, prosthetic dentistry and periodontia. It featured another first for the college’s clinics: air conditioning.

The completion of this building in 1950 was a major achievement for Dr. George L. Powers, dean. For more than 20 years, the college had discussed constructing a new clinic but with no results.

“Dean Powers brought the plan to fruition against almost insurmountable difficulties,” wrote Dr. C. Kenneth Collings, former chair of the Department of Periodontics and founder of the periodontics graduate program, in a memorial to Powers after his death in September 1972. “There were very few people who thought he would succeed. This accomplishment marked the turning point in the fortunes of the dental school.”

Even Dallas County Dental Society members seemed initially doubtful of the project, Powers told his successor, Dean Harry B. McCarthy, in a 1968 letter. Upon completion of the building, the dental school sponsored an open house for local dentists. During the open house, Powers asked how many DCDS members thought the school would ever get a new building. “Only one hand went up,” Powers wrote.

In 1951, the board of trustees of Baylor University initiated another building campaign, this time for funds to construct a basic science wing adjacent to 800 Hall St. Robert B. Monson, comptroller of the Sears Roebuck & Company Southwestern Territory, was named general chairman of a committee that oversaw fundraising from the public. The campaign, the first significant public fund drive in the dental school’s history, raised nearly $600,000 to build a 22,000-square-foot facility. The new basic science wing opened in fall 1954.

Texas A&M College of Dentistry
3302 Gaston Avenue
Dallas, Texas 75246-2013